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27 Feb 2018 description

Children were used to fight in at least 18 conflicts since 2016 - including as ‘human bombs’ - despite a global ban on the use of children in war, a database showed on Wednesday.

Child soldiers were used in Syria, Libya, Nigeria and Colombia - all of which have ratified a United Nations treaty outlawing the conscription of under 18s and their participation in hostilities, the campaign group behind the index said.

11 Feb 2018 description

Global efforts to end the use of child soldiers are still being gravely under-resourced by the international community.

On the International Day Against the Use of Child Soldiers (12 February 2018), Child Soldiers International is calling for UN member states and governments to put the issue of child recruitment back on the international agenda and provide the necessary resources to prevent the use of child soldiers and adequately assist those who return home.

30 Mar 2016 description

The recruitment of children and their use in hostilities by non-state armed groups has been a serious problem for decades. Despite the scale of the problem, few sustained national and international efforts have been concentrated on tackling this serious concern. In its report A law unto themselves?

01 Oct 2014 description

The US government is continuing to exercise pressure through the application of the Child Soldiers Prevention Act (CSPA) by granting partial waivers to some states in order to end their unlawful recruitment and use of children in conflict. In its 2014 Trafficking in Persons report, the US Department of State listed nine states, namely the Central African Republic (CAR), the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Myanmar, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. Chad, this year, does not figure in the list compiled by the US State Department.

01 Oct 2012 description
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Arabic Summary

The report “Louder than words: An agenda for action to end state use of child soldiers” is published to mark the tenth anniversary year of the entry into force of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict. It examines the record of states in protecting children from use in hostilities by their own forces and by state-allied armed groups. It finds that, while governments’ commitment to ending child soldier use is high, the gap between commitment and practice remains wide.