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03 Dec 2018 description

Opened in July 2016, Pagirinya settlement hosts more than 32,000 refugees displaced from South Sudan. The humanitarian response across all sectors has now stabilized and is beginning to shift beyond emergency operations. The way the settlement is organised facilitates access to important facilities, including health centers and schools. However, services in many sectors, such as health and nutrition and water, health and sanitation, must be improved to meet the needs of the population.

Gaps & Challenges

03 Dec 2018 description

Rhino Camp, originally opened in 1980, expanded in the wake of the South Sudanese civil war to host the sudden influx of refugees into northern Uganda. The settlement currently hosts more than 140,000 refugees, mostly South Sudanese, and continues to receive new arrivals. In August 2017, the settlement was expanded with the establishment of the Omugo zone extension area.

Gaps & Challenges

03 Dec 2018 description

Oliji settlement was established on 1 January 1991 in Adjumani district hosting primarily South Sudanese refugees fleeing the Second Sudanese War that broke out in the 1980s as well as the newer wave of South Sudanese refugees fleeing civil war in South Sudan since 2013. Oliji hosts over 1,500 refugees, and provides beneficiaries with both humanitarian and development assistance, however major challenges and gaps in services remain.

Gaps & Challenges

03 Dec 2018 description

Originally closed in 2006 after many South Sudanese refugees returned home, Olua I/II were reopened in 2012 to host another influx of South Sudanese refugees fleeing inter-communal violence. Settlement residents, similarly to other refugees in Adjumani district, live in close proximity to Ugandan nationals and share services and institutions with the host community. Although there is relatively peaceful coexistence between communities, refugees face challenging conditions and need more extensive assistance relating to livelihoods opportunities and education in particular.

13 Nov 2018 description

Bidi Bidi settlement was established in September 2016 to host the rapid influx of South Sudanese refugees, primarily arriving from the Equatoria region. The settlement population increased rapidly to over 280,000 people, making it one of the largest refugee settlements in the world. As of December 2016, Bidi Bidi reached maximum capacity and stopped accepting new arrivals.

Gaps & Challenges

13 Nov 2018 description

Palorinya refugee settlement was established in December 2016 and is located in Moyo district in the West Nile region of Uganda. The settlement currently hosts approximately 166,000 South Sudanese refugees with a total surface area of 37.58 square kilometres and is currently closed to new arrivals.

Gaps & Challenges

13 Nov 2018 description

Located in Western Uganda near the border with the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kyangwali settlement is home to more than 83,000 refugees. Due to its geographical location, Congolese refugees form the majority of the population but there are also Rwandese, Burundians,

13 Nov 2018 description

Palabek is the newest refugee settlement established in Uganda in April 2017. Located in Lamwo district in the northern part of the country, the settlement hosts almost 38,000 South Sudanese refugees. Infrastructure is still being developed because the settlement is new. Refugees seem to be integrating well with the host community, as many of them are from the same ethnic group.

Gaps & Challenges

13 Nov 2018 description

Nakivale, one of the oldest refugee settlements in Uganda, was opened in 1958 and officially established as a settlement in 1960. The settlement hosts more than 100,000 refugees from Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Rwanda, Somalia, Sudan, and South Sudan. During the Burundian crisis in 2015, the population of the settlement greatly increased and has since remained this high. Markets are bustling and food is available for purchase, but many refugees struggle to afford basic items.

Gaps & Challenges

13 Nov 2018 description

Kiryandongo refugee settlement, originally established in 1990, was re-opened in 2014 during the South Sudanese emergency and now hosts almost 60,000 refugees. The majority of refugees are from South Sudan, with a small number from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, and Sudan. Although now closed to new arrivals, partners continue to facilitate settlement of relocated protection cases.

Gaps & Challenges

13 Nov 2018 description

Elema is the oldest settlement in Adjumani district, established in 1992, and is entirely comprised of refugees from the Kuku tribe of South Sudan. Following a UNHCR-led repatriation of South Sudanese refugees in 2008 from Uganda, the Kuku ethnic group in Elema declined to be repatriated. They have as a community settled and integrated well with the mainly Madi people in the host community.

Gaps & Challenges

13 Nov 2018 description

Boroli is located in the Pakele subcounty of Adjumani district and has a surface area of 103 hectares. Boroli I first opened on the 1st January 2014 and its extension, Boroli II, was established and opened in 2015. The vast majority of refugees residing at Boroli settlement are South Sudanese and fled insecurity in their country of origin. Boroli also hosts a minority of refugees from Ethiopia and Somalia.

Gaps & Challenges

13 Nov 2018 description

Ayilo I and II are located in Adjumani District and have a combined surface area of 776 hectares. Ayilo II was established on 6 of July 2014 and Ayilo I was established on 1st of January 2015 in response to the influx of South Sudanese refugees fleeing insecurity in their country of origin. Ayilo I and II no longer take in new arrivals and host together 39,000 refugees. Although partners implement both humanitarian and development oriented services, important gaps in services remain in the settlement that urgently need to be addressed.

Gaps & Challenges

13 Nov 2018 description

Baratuku, initially established in 1991, has hosted successive waves of South Sudanese refugees since the Second Sudanese War. The settlement’s current population is comprised of South Sudanese refugees from the 1990s, who were not able to return home, and recent arrivals who have fled the country since 2013. Humanitarian organizations have begun to shift from emergency response to stabilization. With some emergency-focused partner organizations scaling down or ending their operations, it is critical that gaps in assistance are filled to ensure refugees have sufficient support.

13 Nov 2018 description

Agojo opened in 2016 in response to the influx of South Sudanese refugees fleeing insecurity in their country of origin. It is located 16km west of Adjumani town and was established in order to ease the congestion at Nyumanzi Transit Centre, which was severely overstretched at the time.
South Sudanese refugees were thus relocated to Agojo where over 3,000 of them have now settled. The settlement is no longer receiving new arrivals.

Gaps & Challenges

13 Nov 2018 description

Alere was established on 12 June 1990 in Adjumani District and has a surface area of 119 hectares. The settlement has hosted South Sudanese refugees fleeing the Second Sudanese War as well as more recent arrivals fleeing the country since 2013. Today, Alere hosts over 6,700 South Sudanese refugees and is closed to new arrivals. Projects implemented in the settlement focus both on humanitarian relief as well as development initiatives to improve the refugees' and host communities' resilience and livelihoods, although major gaps still exist.

30 Oct 2018 description

HIGHLIGHTS

The countrywide verification exercise that started on 1st March 2018 was completed on 24th October 2018. The total population of asylum-seekers and refugees verified was 1,091,024 individuals. This represents 75.5% of the estimated target of 1.4 million registered persons. More detailed results and updated population figures of asylumseekers and refugees in Uganda will be made available soon.

29 Oct 2018 description

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER—UNHCR—WFP
JOINT PRESS RELEASE

KAMPALA: The Office of the Prime Minister (OPM) and UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency have concluded the countrywide biometric verification exercise of all asylum-seekers and refugees in Uganda.

The exercise was concluded on Wednesday October 24th 2018, in the last two remaining locations – Bidibidi refugee settlement and Kampala.

24 Oct 2018 description

HIGHLIGHTS

The ongoing verification of refugees in Uganda that started on 1 st March 2018, verified a total of 17,428 individuals last week bringing the total as of 20th October 2018 to 1,088,415. This represents 75.3% of the estimated target of 1.4 million registered refugees. The highest daily output was 5,374 individuals verified in a single day last week.