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07 Apr 2017 description
report Chatham House

Summary

• In delivering assistance to civilians in areas controlled by non-state armed groups (NSAGs), humanitarian actors sometimes have no choice but to make payments or provide incidental benefts to NSAGs.

05 Apr 2013 description
report Chatham House

Despite strong economic growth in many countries of the Horn and Sahel, environmental and demographic changes coupled to low levels of political inclusion and high instability mean that the risk of acute food crises is likely to increase. Conflict and geopolitics act as risk multipliers, meaning that full-blown famine remains a real threat, as was seen most recently in Somalia during 2011.

15 Dec 2009 description
report Chatham House

Summary points

- Among the drivers of conflict in the Horn of Africa economic motivations have been ubiquitous and pervasive in prompting and sustaining conflict. At other times economic drivers have exhibited a potential for peaceful cooperation. An understanding of their role and relationship with other forces of change is essential.

- Conflict in the Horn frequently has economic impacts across national borders.

18 Nov 2009 description
report Chatham House

Roger Middleton, December 2009, The World Today, Volume 65, Number 12

The north eastern corner of Africa is again witnessing shocking scenes of deprivation. The Horn of Africa, from Sudan through Kenya and Ethiopia to Somalia regularly suffers from prolonged and devastating food shortages and this is one of the worst for many years. Preventing repeats of this suffering depends as much on the politics of the region as on aid and development.

ACCORDING TO THE WORLD FOOD Programme, around twenty million people in the Horn of Africa need food aid.

18 Nov 2009 description
report Chatham House

Gerrard Cowan, December 2009, The World Today, Volume 65, Number 12

It sometimes seems that the only people who want to stay in Somalia are pirates. While the Gulf of Aden is notorious as a haven for modern-day Blackbeards, the past year has also seen a dramatic upsurge in people smuggling, which has been costlier in human lives and far less reported in the international media. Conflict and climate are the driving forces.

RAINFALL AND FOOD HAVE LONG BEEN SCARCE IN Somalia.

28 Oct 2009 description
report Chatham House

Transcript

HE Omar Abdirashid Ali Sharmarke

30 Sep 2009 description
report Chatham House

Summary Points

- Somaliland currently faces a critical constitutional and political dilemma.

22 Jul 2009 description
report Chatham House

The views expressed in this document are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect the view of Chatham House, its staff, associates or Council. Chatham House is independent and owes no allegiance to any government or to any political body. It does not take institutional positions on policy issues.

This document is issued on the understanding that if any extract is used, the speaker and Chatham House should be credited, preferably with details of the event.

31 Mar 2009 description
report Chatham House

By Sonya Sceats

Summary points

- Human rights abuses on a massive scale continue to afflict the lives of millions of people across the continent of Africa. As in other parts of the world, the obstacles in pursuing justice are currently insurmountable for most victims.

- Against this troubling backdrop, the African Union (AU) has decided to add a human rights section to its new court which has been agreed upon but not yet set up.

01 Oct 2008 description
report Chatham House

Summary points

- Piracy off the coast of Somalia has more than doubled in 2008; so far over 60 ships have been attacked. Pirates are regularly demanding and receiving million-dollar ransom payments and are becoming more aggressive and assertive.

- The international community must be aware of the danger that Somali pirates could become agents of international terrorist networks.

23 Jun 2008 description
report Chatham House

Executive summary

This report is a study of three peace processes in the Horn of Africa, a region of Africa distinguished by the prevalence and persistence of armed conflict. It deals with the Algiers Agreement of December 2000 between Ethiopia and Eritrea, the Somalia National Peace and Reconciliation Process concluded in October 2004 and the Sudan Comprehensive Peace Agreement of January 2005. It examines in turn the background and historical context of the conflicts that these peace agreements were intended to resolve.