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25 Jan 2012 description

Brief description of the NCA Emergency Response (Monsoon 2011):

  • As of 1st January 2012, according to FAO, 86% of the flood water has receded from the flood affected areas with 1,972 km of land still under water. Badin, Sanghar, Umerkot and Mirpurkhas still remain severely affected by the floods with residual floodwater still present

  • All Clusters have presented Early Recovery projects to the Provincial Disaster Management Authority in Sindh and Balochistan for a possible launch of the Early Recovery Framework by end of January

25 Jan 2012 description

Brief description of the NCA Emergency Response (Monsoon 2011):

  • As of 1st January 2012, according to FAO, 86% of the flood water has receded from the flood affected areas with 1,972 km of land still under water. Badin, Sanghar, Umerkot and Mirpurkhas still remain severely affected by the floods with residual floodwater still present

  • All Clusters have presented Early Recovery projects to the Provincial Disaster Management Authority in Sindh and Balochistan for a possible launch of the Early Recovery Framework by end of January

06 Oct 2011 description

Brief description of the emergency:

The unprecedented monsoon rain 2011 has affected people of Sindh again, this time more severely as around 9 million people have got affected in comparison with last years total figure of around 7 million. This time the right bank districts of Badin, Mirpurkhas, Sanghar, Tando Mohammad Khan, Tando Allahyar, Thatta, Nawabshah are the worst affected ones.

20 Sep 2011 description

1.) Brief description of the emergency

According to media news things are going bad to worst in Pakistan flood affected areas of Sindh Province. Due to worst flood over eight million people have already displaced and urgent need of food and shelter. Four million acres agriculture land already swept away in flood water and economic cost of flood disaster is causing further harm to country weak economy. Pakistan government has already appeal for international help.

2.) Impact

14 Sep 2010 description

Background:

As many as 800,000 people were forced to sleep under the open skies during the Eid holiday this past weekend. As floodwaters have receded in the northern parts of the country, towns and villages in the southern provinces are still submerged. The scale of this humanitarian tragedy is far impacting and the larger challenges are yet to begin.

An estimated seven million people will be homeless for some time according to recent predictions. Immediate relief is still needed while the approaching winter season, particularly in the northern areas, causes great concern. Dr.

27 Aug 2010 description

Background:

Although the millions of Pakistanis affected by the floods are unquestionably in high need of immediate shelter, food and other basic necessities, the latest concern for some people is starting over again. The floods have extended in some southern areas and most recently devastated communities in Thatta District. Some areas throughout the country remain inaccessible by road while in others floodwaters receded and have remained that way for more than a week. U.N. estimates reveal that approximately 4.6 million people are without shelter.

11 Jul 2007 description

Hundreds of thousands are in dire need of relief aid in the flood-affected regions of Pakistan. Norwegian Church Aid has now opened an emergency donor hotline for the flood victims, and is now appealing for donations.

"People are living in the most dreadful conditions. Aid is required urgently and for many, time is running out," says Bjørg Mide, acting head of International Programmes at Norwegian Church Aid.

Over the last week, Norwegian Church Aid has been a part of a comprehensive assessment mission in the Balochistan and Sindh provinces of southern Pakistan.

06 Oct 2006 description

A year after the massive Pakistan earthquake, less than two percent of houses in the most seriously affected areas having been rebuilt. It means that hundreds of thousands of people are preparing to endure another winter without shelter, and there is much evidence to suggest that these communities are facing another humanitarian emergency.

By Arne Grieg Riisnæs, Norwegian Church Aid, ACT International

The massive earthquake that shook parts of Pakistan October 8, 2005, killed some 80,000 people, injured at least 200,000, and left nearly 3.5 million people without shelter.

11 Jan 2006 description

Children in the earthquake-shaken areas of Pakistan are still wearing plastic sandals and summer clothes in 50cm of snow. Norwegian Church Aid is appealing for donations to purchase warm clothes and boots.

05 Dec 2005 description

"We're still fully involved in emergency response activities, but both money and time are running out," says Atle Sommerfeldt, Norwegian Church Aid's General Secretary, on his return from Pakistan.

Sommerfeldt has just returned home to Norway after a week visit to the earthquake zone in Pakistan. He says he was moved to witness the destruction and to experience the feeling of being in the middle of a disaster zone almost two months after the earthquake rocked the region on October 8th.

09 Nov 2005 description

Arild Isaksen, head of emergency response in Norwegian Church Aid, has flown to Pakistan to visit the reflief effort underway there. He will be met by new emergency coordinator Anne Angeltveit.

03 Nov 2005 description

The Finnish government has donated 1000 military winter tents to the Action by Churches Together Pakistan earthquake relief effort. Norwegian Church Aid is taking care of the transport.

With 3.5 million people left homeless by the 7.6 magnitude earthquake that hit the region, and with winter advancing, shelter is an urgent priority. These tents, specially designed to withstand even the coldest Finnish winter weather, are each fitted with a wood-burning stove and will provide heated accommodation for 15,000 people.

20 Oct 2005 description

The situation is a ticking bomb. The lack of hygiene present here is on a scale that I have never seen in 30 years in this sector," says Bill Fellows, UNICEF to Norwegian Church Aid/ACT.

By Arne Grieg Riisnæs, Norwegian Church Aid/ACT, Islamabad, Pakistan

Bill Fellows, UNICEF senior regional officer for water and sanitation in South Asia, was in Pakistan assisting the government in organising a sanitation conference when the earthquake rocked the region. He now coordinates the international aid response within the fields of water and sanitation.

19 Oct 2005 description

Norwegian Church Aid is sending three Emergency Preparedness Team members to Pakistan where they will join the relief effort, focusing primarily within the fields of water and sanitation.

The three Norwegians are all longstanding Emergency Preparedness Team members, each with extensive experience of work in challenging emergency situations. This experience will be valuable to them; as they have been sent into an emergency situation of unknowable magnitude, where logistics are difficult and conditions are changeable.

19 Oct 2005 description

Norwegian Church Aid's partners, the Diocese of Peshawar, will today open a field hospital in the district of Balagram near Balakot that will serve a population of 50,000 - 100,000 local people.

A team of health workers arrived in the area earlier this week to begin the work. The 50-bed field hospital will help attend to the medical needs of the local population - needs which are great and urgent following the earthquake that rocked the region some ten days ago.

Authorities estimate that around 1000 hospitals and clinics collapsed as a result of the earthquake.

16 Oct 2005 description

On Monday 17th October, Norwegian Church Aid will send its first aircraft from Oslo Gardemoen carrying lifesaving aid to the earthquake-shattered regions of Pakistan.

The aircraft will take off from Gardemoen at 10:00 am on Monday morning and will be loaded with urgently needed relief items, primarily tents and woollen blankets, that will provide shelter and warmth to many thousands of people who have been left homeless and vulnerable after last weekend's disaster.

14 Oct 2005 description

When the very first, crucial aid deliveries reached remote villages in the province of Balakot in Kashmir yesterday, Norwegian Church Aid was there. The scenes were heartbreaking.

By Arne Grieg Riisnæs, Batagram, Pakistan

The earthquake could hardly have struck a more vulnerable region of Pakistan-controlled Kashmir.

10 Oct 2005 description

Norwegian Church Aid is hard at work in earthquake-devastated regions of Pakistan. We aim, through ACT International, to distribute food, shelter and blankets to 100,000 people.

"We still do not know the extent of the damage this earthquake has caused, but developments over the last 24 hours indicate clearly that we are facing a very large humanitarian emergency," says Atle Sommerfeldt, Norwegian Church Aid's General Secretary.

Norwegian Church Aid has now opened a special bank account for donations to help the earthquake victims in Pakistan and India.