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16 Aug 2016 description

What is La Niña?

La Niña is the cooling of sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific, which occurs roughly every three to five years, lasting from six to 24 months. On average, half of El Niño events are followed by a La Niña, which typically affects global climate patterns in the opposite way El Niño does. The intensity of the La Niña climatic phenomenon generally peaks between October and January

Purpose of this report

05 Jul 2016 description

Global overview

What is La Niña?

La Niña is the cooling of sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific, which occurs roughly every three to five years, lasting from six to 24 months. The chances of La Niña following an El Niño episode are higher on average — half of the El Niño events are followed by a La Niña — and typically it affects global climate patterns in the opposite way El Niño does. The intensity of the La Niña climatic phenomenon generally peaks between October and January.

Purpose of this report

07 Jun 2016 description

THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION,

Having regard to the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

Having regard to Council Regulation (EC) No 1257/96 of 20 June 1996 concerning humanitarian aid1 , and in particular Article 2, Article 4 and Article 15(2) and (3) thereof,

Having regard to Council Decision 2013/755/EU of 25 November 2013 on the association of the overseas countries and territories with the European Union2 , and in particular Article 79 thereof,

03 Jun 2016 description

The humanitarian impact of the 2015-2016 El Niño remains deeply alarming, now affecting over 60 million people. Central America, East Africa (particularly Ethiopia), the Pacific and Southern Africa remain the most affected regions. The El Niño phenomenon is now in decline, but projections indicate the situation will worsen throughout at least the end of the year, with food insecurity caused primarily by drought not likely to peak before December. Therefore, the humanitarian impacts will last well into 2017 .

13 Apr 2012 description

This monthly newsletter highlights UNISDR activities around the world. This issue reports on: (i) the start of consultations on a new international blueprint for reducing disaster losses in advance of the World Conference on Disaster Reduction; (ii) the Sixth World Water Forum's disaster risk reduction (DRR) pledge; (iii) private sector's risk revolution; (iv) the drought situation in the Horn of Africa; and (v) Kiribati's climate change insurance.