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07 Jan 2019 description

Children continue to pay a high price in today’s global conflicts. The recruitment and use of children remains a hallmark of war and the UN Secretary-General’s 2018 annual report, released in June, listed 56 non-state armed groups and seven state armed forces for recruiting and using child soldiers in 2017.

20 Dec 2017 description

Key events and progress over the financial year

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

Central African Republic (CAR) has spiralled into increasing violence in the last year, with up to two-thirds of the country controlled by armed groups.

Thousands of children have been recruited by these groups – often with the support of their families or communities. Demobilising these children is problematic, since the armed groups who recruited them usually belong to the same communities.

30 Jun 2016 description

Child Soldiers International compiled this submission on the USA's compliance with the Optional Protocol on the involvement of children in armed Conflict (OPAC).

The report includes questions and recommendations on its enlistment age; safeguards and consent; participation in hostilities; recruitment in schools; criminalisation; protection; recovery and reintegration; and arms exports and military assistance.

31 Mar 2016 description

The Afghan National Police (ANP) including the Afghan Local Police (ALP) and three armed groups including Taliban forces are listed as persistent perpetrators in the 2015 Annual Report of the UN Secretary-General to the Security Council on children and armed conflict for the recruitment and use of children.

30 Mar 2016 description

The recruitment of children and their use in hostilities by non-state armed groups has been a serious problem for decades. Despite the scale of the problem, few sustained national and international efforts have been concentrated on tackling this serious concern. In its report A law unto themselves?

11 Nov 2014 description

London, 11 November, 2014 - The passing of legislation to criminalise underage recruitment in the Afghan National Security Forces constitutes a significant step in protecting the rights of Afghan children, Child Soldiers International said today. Last week, the Afghan Lower House of Parliament approved the draft law which criminalises the recruitment and use of children in state security forces.

01 Oct 2012 description
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Arabic Summary

The report “Louder than words: An agenda for action to end state use of child soldiers” is published to mark the tenth anniversary year of the entry into force of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict. It examines the record of states in protecting children from use in hostilities by their own forces and by state-allied armed groups. It finds that, while governments’ commitment to ending child soldier use is high, the gap between commitment and practice remains wide.