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30 Jan 2019 description
report BioMed Central

Philippa Druce†, Ekaterina Bogatyreva†, Frederik Francois Siem, Scott Gates, Hanna Kaade, Johanne Sundby, Morten Rostrup, Catherine Andersen, Siri Camilla Aas Rustad, Andrew Tchie, Robert Mood, Håvard Mokleiv Nygård, Henrik Urdal and Andrea Sylvia Winkler

†Contributed equally

Conflict and Health 2019 13:2

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13031-019-0186-0 | © The Author(s). 2019

Abstract

21 Mar 2017 description
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BMC International Health and Human Rights BMC series – open, inclusive and trusted 2017 17:7 DOI: 10.1186/s12914-017-0116-4© The Author(s). 2017

Received: 17 September 2016 Accepted: 11 March 2017 Published: 20 March 2017

Waleed M. Sweileh

Abstract

02 Nov 2016 description
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Conflict and Health 2016 10:25

DOI: 10.1186/s13031-016-0089-2 © The Author(s). 2016

Received: 20 October 2015 Accepted: 18 July 2016 Published: 2 November 2016

Abstract

Background

18 Feb 2016 description
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Malaria Journal 2016 15:98
DOI: 10.1186/s12936-016-1149-1© Ahmad et al. 2016

Published: 18 February 2016

Abstract

Background

26 Nov 2014 description
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Conflict and Health 2014, 8:24 doi:10.1186/1752-1505-8-24

Published: 25 November 2014

Abstract (provisional)

Background

28 Oct 2014 description
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Abstract

Background: Definitions of fragile states focus on state willingness and capacity to ensure security and provide essential services, including health. Conventional analyses and subsequent policies that focus on state-delivered essential services miss many developments in severely disrupted healthcare arenas. The research seeks to gain insights about the large sections of the health field left to evolve spontaneously by the absent or diminished state.

07 Dec 2012 description
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Abstract (provisional) This research assesses informal markets that dominate pharmaceutical systems in severely disrupted countries and identifies areas for further investigation. Findings are based on recent academic papers, policy and grey literature, and field studies in Somalia, Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Haiti. The public sector in the studied countries is characterized in part by weak Ministries of Health and low donor coordination.

13 May 2010 description
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Farida Adimi , Radina P Soebiyanto , Najibullah Safi and Richard Kiang

Malaria Journal 2010, 9:125doi:10.1186/1475-2875-9-125

Published:        13 May 2010

Abstract (provisional)

Background

Malaria is a significant public health concern in Afghanistan. Currently, approximately 60% of the population, or nearly 14 million people, live in a malaria-endemic area. Afghanistan's diverse landscape and terrain contributes to the heterogeneous malaria prevalence across the country.

06 Jan 2010 description
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Abstract (provisional)

Background

Scaling up insecticide-treated mosquito net (ITN) coverage is a key malaria control strategy even in conflict-affected countries [1-2]. Socio-economic factors influence access to ITNs whether subsidized or provided free to users. This study examines reported ITN purchasing, coverage, and usage in eastern Afghanistan and explores women's access to health information during the Taliban regime (1996-2001).

29 Aug 2008 description
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Abstract

Background

The present study was performed to assess, beyond socio-economic factors, independent associations between the health and nutritional status of children under 5 years old and (1) family behavioural factors related to women with regard to child care and (2) war-related experience by the household of hardships in Afghanistan.

Methods

The subjects were all children born during the previous 5 years from 1400 households in Kabul Province, Afghanistan and were selected by multistage sampling in March 2006.

15 Nov 2007 description
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Abstract

Although epidemiology is increasingly contributing to policy debates on issues of conflict and human rights, its potential is still underutilized. As a result, this article calls for greater collaboration between public health researchers, conflict analysts and human rights monitors, with special emphasis on retrospective, population-based surveys.