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TANZANIA Price Bulletin August 2014

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The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year.

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UN expert condemns 'appalling' abuse of Tanzania albinos

08/25/2014 17:01 GMT

GENEVA, August 25, 2014 (AFP) - A UN expert Monday condemned the abuse of young albinos in government care centres in Tanzania, a country where many are killed and their body parts sold as lucky charms.

At least 74 albinos have been murdered in the east African country since 2000.

After a spike in killings in 2009, the government placed youngsters in children's homes in a desperate effort to defend them, Alicia Londono, of the UN human rights office, told reporters.

Agence France-Presse:

©AFP: The information provided in this product is for personal use only. None of it may be reproduced in any form whatsoever without the express permission of Agence France-Presse.

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Tanzania Remote Monitoring Update August 2014

Moderately above-average maize harvest led to low and stable prices

KEY MESSAGES

  • Stable staple prices are expected to continue as harvesting is completed and marketing continues.
    Estimated production is very similar to 2013, moderately above average, ensuring continued supply to markets.

  • Kenya’s government has arranged a large maize purchase from Tanzania. This maize should help keep prices stable in Kenya while providing funds for restocking in Tanzania.

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Helping families build their resilience in the aftermath of a disaster

By Sheila Chemjor, IFRC

Families in Morogoro’s Dakawa and Kilosa area, 270 kilometres northwest of Tanzania’s capital Dar es Salaam, are rebuilding their lives following flash floods that left a massive trail of destruction earlier in the year, affecting at least 10,000 people. It is the first time since the 1970s that they had experienced such heavy rainfall and as such were completely unprepared. Some houses were washed away leaving no trace of their existence.

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Tanzania Price Bulletin July 2014

Maize is the main staple crop in Tanzania. Rise and beans are also very important, the latter constituting the main source of protein for most low- and middle- income households. Dar es Salaam is the main consumer market in the country. Arusha is another important market and is linked with Kenya in the north. Dodoma represents the central region of the country, a semi-arid, deficit area. Mtwara sits in a south coastal deficit area while Songea and Mbeya represent the southern highlands. Tanga is also a coastal town in the north, with trade connections with Kenya.

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Tanzania Remote Monitoring Update July 2014

Low maize prices are anticipated as the government plans to sell stock

KEY MESSAGES

  • Harvests in the northern areas have started in July and are continuing in the South. Maize-producing areas in the South are supplying the maize-deficit northern areas. There is high demand from traders for domestic and export markets in the maize-producing areas of Mbeya and Songea, but prices are on their seasonal decline.

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Innovations in banana cropping systems in Tanzania

Some 80% of the Tanzanian population depends on agriculture for a living. In the North-West, near Lake Victoria, banana is the most important staple crop. The majority of production however is through subsistence farming rather than commercial production. By introducing new banana varieties and providing training on technical management as well as marketing skills, the Banana cropping project aimed to improve the livelihoods of banana farmers in the region.

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Tanzania Acts to Protect Trafficked Children

Tanzania - To facilitate an effective response to protecting, assisting and referring victims of trafficking, especially children, IOM Tanzania, in collaboration with Tanzania’s Anti-Trafficking Secretariat, is this week convening a stakeholders meeting to develop Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs.)

The 3-day event, which began yesterday, is taking place today at the Stella Maris Hotel in Bagamoyo and attendees include Secretary of the Anti-Trafficking Committee from the Ministry of Home Affairs Seperatus Fella.

International Organization for Migration:

Copyright © IOM. All rights reserved.

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Fistula survivors treated through M-Pesa mobile banking scheme in Tanzania

NEW YORK, United States – Mama Hadija, now in her 60s, had grown accustomed to living in shame. Over 25 years ago, in the rural town of Morogoro, Tanzania, Ms. Hadija experienced a prolonged, obstructed labour. The ordeal caused her to develop an obstetric fistula, a form of internal damage that results in incontinence, stigma and isolation.

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As floods threaten, Tanzania aims to build a megacity that works

Report
AlertNet

Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation - Mon, 21 Jul 2014 12:15 GMT
Author: Kizito Makoye

DAR ES SALAAM (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Tanzania’s largest commercial city - one of the fastest-growing in Africa - has redrawn its master plan to try to become a megacity prepared for climate change, and not a city of worsening urban sprawl and flooding.

Read the full article on AlertNet

AlertNet:



For more humanitarian news and analysis, please visit www.trust.org/alertnet

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Japan Supports Refugees In Tanzania

DAR ES SALAAM – The Japanese government has contributed US$1.4 million to the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to provide food assistance to some 70,000 refugees in north-western Tanzania.

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Emirates Red Crescent drilling 20 wells in Tanzania

The Emirates Red Crescent has started work on drilling 20 wells in Tanzania to help more than 40,000 people in 27 villages gain access to potable water.

The project in the region of Loliondo is being carried out in coordination with the U.A.E. Embassy in Dar es Salaam and the Tanzanian authorities.

"We have received an immense response to the U.A.E. Water Aid appeal from all sectors of society, locally, regionally and internationally,” said Dr Mohammed Al Falahi, the secretary general of the U.A.E. Red Crescent.

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Tanzania Price Bulletin - June 2014

Maize is the main staple crop in Tanzania. Rise and beans are also very important, the latter constituting the main source of protein for most low- and middle- income households. Dar es Salaam is the main consumer market in the country. Arusha is another important market and is linked with Kenya in the north. Dodoma represents the central region of the country, a semi-arid, deficit area. Mtwara sits in a south coastal deficit area while Songea and Mbeya represent the southern highlands. Tanga is also a coastal town in the north, with trade connections with Kenya.

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Tanzania Report Monitoring Report June 2014

Total crops harvested in 2014 will likely be similar to 2013

Key Messages

  • Ongoing harvests in unimodal areas and the green harvest in bimodal areas have improved food availability and decreased household demand from markets. Staple food prices have stabilized, and they will likely decrease over the coming months due to the increased supplies.

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Tanzania Brings Maternal Care to Rural Women’s Doorsteps

Health workers deliver lifesaving services to expectant mothers

June 2014—Over 8,500 women die each year in Tanzania from pregnancy-related complications such as severe hemorrhage, sepsis, obstructed labor, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and complications from unsafe abortions. Almost all of these ailments are preventable and present little danger if pregnant women get access to skilled health care providers. Early identification of symptoms is critical to successful treatment and the avoidance of fatal consequences.

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Swahili for love

Report
Convoy of Hope

As we pull into the Ilkiding’a village in Tanzania, children smile and wave as we pass by. It had rained the day before, but the sun was out now leaving the air feeling fresh and everything greener than ever.

We pull into a gated area that holds a beautiful church and some additional buildings. We are surrounded by beautiful trees, plants and crops that have been planted and carefully landscaped. The air is so clean and fresh, I can’t help but take a deep breath just to soak it all in.

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World Bank Board Approves Additional Funds for a Joint Program to Improve Water Access for 1.5 Million Tanzanians

Report
World Bank

WASHINGTON, June 16, 2014 – The World Bank Board of Executive Directors has approved support to Tanzania to help expand access to safe water and sanitation services for the poor in rural and urban communities, and to improve the management of the country’s natural water resources.

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GIEWS Country Brief: United Republic of Tanzania 13-June-2014

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  • Favourable general outlook for 2014 “msimu” and “masika” seasons crops

  • Lower yields are expected in some northwestern areas due to erratic rains since mid-April

  • Recent flooding in coastal areas likely to affect grain quality

  • Maize prices declined in major markets following the start of 2014 “mismu” season harvest