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31 May 2016 description

More than one year after the first influx of refugees began, some 1,000 people fleeing political unrest in Burundi continue to cross the border each week to Tanzania. They join thousands of others living in overcrowded and ever-expanding refugee camps. Two of the three existing sites—Nyarugusu and Nduta—have already swelled to capacity. A third camp, Mtendeli, is now receiving refugees transferred from the overcrowded Nyarugusu camp, as well as newly arrived refugees from the border areas. There are now approximately 140,000 Burundians living in Tanzania.

30 May 2016 description

Asha Goa was born with a severe disability that affected her ability to work, but with support from the U.S. Agency for International Development under Feed the Future, she was able to create a successful business and carve a path to financial independence. Raised in Kilombero district, the only source of income Goa had was the 25 cents she received weekly from family and friends. That changed in 2014, when Goa joined a Feed the Future-supported Savings and Internal Lending Community, or SILC group.

30 May 2016 description

The current Burundi refugee situation in Tanzania began late April 2015. The months that followed saw significantly high number of persons of concern arrivng in Tanzania, mainly through Kagunga, a tiny border village along Lake Tanganyika and other entry points in Kigoma region. The population was relocated to Nyarugusu camp, which was already host to 65,000 persons of concern, mainly DR Congolese. The camp quickly ran out of capacity to host the new population, prompting the opening of a new camp, Nduta, in Kibondo district on 07-Oct-2015. Nduta's capacity has been put at 60,000.

26 May 2016 description

The current Burundi refugee situation in Tanzania began late April 2015. The months that followed saw significantly high number of persons of concern arrivng in Tanzania, mainly through Kagunga, a tiny border village along Lake Tanganyika and other entry points in Kigoma region. The population was relocated to Nyarugusu camp, which was already host to 65,000 persons of concern, mainly DR Congolese. The camp quickly ran out of capacity to host the new population, prompting the opening of a new camp, Nduta, in Kibondo district on 07-Oct-2015. Nduta's capacity has been put at 60,000.

24 May 2016 description

Highlights

  • Burundian refugees continue to arrive into Tanzania.
    According to UNHCR, the total population of new Burundian refugees in Tanzania is over 137,000, bringing the combined Congolese and Burundian refugee population in Tanzania to over 200,000.

  • UNESCO and WFP, in partnership with XPRIZE and the Government of Tanzania, officially launched the XPRIZE Global Learning competition in Tanzania.

24 May 2016 description

Highlights

Almost 139,000 Burundian refugees have crossed over into Tanzania since April 2015. Combined with a pre-influx population of about 65,000, the total refugee population stands at over 203,000.

The average arrival rate in April was 113 individuals per day. All new arrivals are transported to Mtendeli Refugee

Situation Update

23 May 2016 description

Food insecurity anticipated to ease significantly, following upcoming favorable harvests

Key Messages

20 May 2016 description

The current Burundi refugee situation in Tanzania began late April 2015. The months that followed saw significantly high number of persons of concern arrivng in Tanzania, mainly through Kagunga, a tiny border village along Lake Tanganyika and other entry points in Kigoma region. The population was relocated to Nyarugusu camp, which was already host to 65,000 persons of concern, mainly DR Congolese. The camp quickly ran out of capacity to host the new population, prompting the opening of a new camp, Nduta, in Kibondo district on 07-Oct-2015. Nduta's capacity has been put at 60,000.

18 May 2016 description
report AlertNet

Tuesday, 17 May 2016 17:21 GMT

By Kizito Makoye

DAR ES SALAAM, May 17 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Drought-afflicted herders have been ordered to remove their cattle from Tanzania's national parks, where they had moved in a bid to find new food sources, the Tanzanian government said late on Monday.

Read the story on the Thomson Reuters Foundation

16 May 2016 description

KEY FIGURES
As at May 5, 2016

140,407
Total Burundian population of concern

137,577
Total Burundian population post influx

68,488
Total Burundian population in Nyarugusu Camp (Pre-Influx + Influx)

55,145
Total population in Nduta Camp

13,908
Total population in Mtendeli Camp

36
Total population in Lumasi Transit Site

HIGHLIGHTS

16 May 2016 description

Help us raise awareness on the effects of hunger and malnutrition in Tanzania by sharing these ten facts.

1) With a population of 50 million, Tanzania is a low-income food-deficit country.

2) Tanzania ranks 151 out of 188 countries in the Human Development Index (2015).

3) Tanzania’s economy has grown strongly in recent years, driven mainly by telecommunications, financial services, transport and construction. Despite this progress, nearly 3 Tanzanians out of 10 live in poverty, and 1 in 3 is illiterate.

11 May 2016 description

Highlights

Almost 137,000 Burundian refugees have crossed over into Tanzania since April 2015. Combined with a preinflux population of about 65,000, the total refugee population stands at over 202,000.

The average daily influx of refugees into Tanzania is 100 persons per day.

Situation Update

09 May 2016 description

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  • Production prospects of 2016 “msimu” crops generally favourable
  • Maize prices stable or declining but at high levels
  • Favourable food security conditions observed across the country, with pockets of food insecurity in some northeastern regions that experienced three below‑average consecutive harvests
  • As end April 2016, refugees and asylum seekers from DRC and Burundi were estimated at 205 000

Favourable production prospects for 2016 main “msimu” season crops

02 May 2016 description
report APOPO

Earlier this year, APOPO in partnership with the Tanzanian Veterinary Laboratory Agency (TVLA) set plans in motion to begin building APOPO’s new TB center in Dar es salaam with a top-notch lab, brand new rat facilities and TB detection rooms. Construction is progressing well and on-schedule for operations to start by July 2016.

30 Apr 2016 description
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English version

Expected average harvest will sufficiently cover local demand

KEY MESSAGES

  • Average to above-average Msimu rains in the unimodal areas will likely result in a near-normal harvest. Poor households remain market dependent and face income opportunity constraints following the conclusion of agricultural activities. This area is Stressed (IPC Phase 2) and will likely improve to Minimal (IPC Phase 1) with the beginning of the harvest season in May, but there will still be populations that have higher levels of food insecurity.