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Rwanda Price Bulletin April 2014

Beans are the most common staple commodities across all regions in Rwanda. Maize, cassava, Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes and bananas are also very important. Beans and Maize are cultivated generally in all districts of the Country, Irish potato mainly in Northern and Western parts of the Country and Banana in Eastern parts. Staple food prices are usually lower in January-February, after season A, and in July-August, following the season B harvest. Prices are higher in October-November and May-June during the lean periods.

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Rwandan Genocide: Repairing Hope

During 100 horrifying days in 1994, approximately 800,000 Tutsi people were systematically killed in what is now known as the Rwandan Genocide. The massacre left many surviving children, such as 6-year-old Liberatha Ingabrire, as the heads of their families.

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Rwanda Food Security Outlook Update March 2014

Below-average food stocks and start of season B for most households

Key Messages

Season A harvests are complete across most of the country. Production of beans, maize, Irish potato, and wheat were generally 20-30 percent below normal due to poor rainfall performance.

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Nutrition Education Nourishes Lives in Rural Rwanda

Community nutrition groups provide education and training to fight malnutrition in both adults and children

While Rwandan families are encouraged to prevent malnutrition, most rural communities lack the ingredients and knowledge to prepare a balanced diet. In most cases, they grapple with lack of other basic needs and end up giving little attention to the quality of food they eat.

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Rwanda Price Bulletin March 2014

Beans are the most common staple commodities across all regions in Rwanda. Maize, cassava, Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes and bananas are also very important. Beans and Maize are cultivated generally in all districts of the Country, Irish potato mainly in Northern and Western parts of the Country and Banana in Eastern parts. Staple food prices are usually lower in January-February, after season A, and in July-August, following the season B harvest. Prices are higher in October-November and May-June during the lean periods.

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Rwanda Bulletin des Prix Mars 2014

Le haricot est la denrée alimentaire la plus consomée dans toutes les régions du Rwanda. Le maïs, le manioc, la pomme de terre, la patate douce at la banane sont aussi importants. Le haricot et le maïs sont normalement cultivés dans tous les districts, la pomme de terre est prédominante au Nord et à l’Ouest du pays et la banane à l’Est. Les prix des denrées alimentaires sont généralement bas en Janvier-Février après les récoltes de la saison A, ainsi qu’en Juillet-Aout après les récoltes de la saison B.

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Toughness in Yellow: Sharing Lessons on Food Security and Nutrition in Rwanda

By Luis Blandon

Luis Blandon visited Global Communities Rwanda’s projects during the Cracking the Nut conference in January 2014 and wrote this reflective piece after his visit.

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Rwanda Food Security Outlook Update February 2014

Food security among poor households improves following the Season A harvest

Key Messages:

The recent Season A harvest has generally replenished household food stocks back to normal levels, seasonally improving food access for poor households across the country. Between January and June 2014, most households will be able to meet essential food and non-food needs without major difficulties, and all regions will face Minimal (IPC Phase 1) acute food insecurity.

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The Cost of Hunger in Rwanda: Social and Economic Impacts of Child Undernutrition in Rwanda - Implications on National Development and Vision 2020

Hunger Costs Rwanda US$820 Million Annually

A groundbreaking new study has revealed that the effects of hunger and undernutrition in Rwanda cost the country US$820 million (504 billion Rwanda francs) annually -- the equivalent of 11.5 percent of its annual GDP.

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Rwanda + 1 other
WFP Introduces Cash Transfers for Refugees in Gihembe Camp

As part of its commitments to enhance food security, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) has introduced cash transfers to feed the 14,500 refugees in Gihembe refugee camp in northern Rwanda.

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GIEWS Country Brief: Rwanda 11-February-2014

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  • The 2014 “A season” harvest forecast at average levels despite localized production shortfalls

  • Food prices declining as newly harvested crops increase supplies

  • Minimal levels of food insecurity, including in areas affected by production shortfalls

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Global Communities in Rwanda: USAID Ejo Heza Program Video

Having worked in Rwanda since 2005, Global Communities is currently implementing the USAID Ejo Heza (“brighter future”) program in Rwanda, which aims to improve the livelihoods and food consumption of 75,000 of the country’s very poor, particularly women. This video showcases the work Global Communities has done through the program in the areas of agriculture, health & nutrition, financial services, and literacy. Also covered in the video are the "Be the Change" Volunteers, who are considered the "heart and soul" of USAID Ejo Heza.

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Rwanda Price Bulletin January 2014

Beans are the most common staple commodities across all regions in Rwanda. Maize, cassava, Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes and bananas are also very important. Beans and Maize are cultivated generally in all districts of the Country, Irish potato mainly in Northern and Western parts of the Country and Banana in Eastern parts. Staple food prices are usually lower in January-February, after season A, and in July-August, following the season B harvest. Prices are higher in October-November and May-June during the lean periods.

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Rwanda Price Bulletin November 2013

Beans are the most common staple commodities across all regions in Rwanda.

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Rwanda + 1 other
The Central Emergency Fund allocates $2.3 million to Rwandans expelled from Tanzania

Nearly 11,500 people of Rwandan origin had arrived from Tanzania by the end of September 2013. The Central Emergency Fund has allocated $2.3 million to provide them with assistance.

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:

To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit http://unocha.org/.

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Rwanda + 1 other
Minister Dijksma and the Clinton Foundation launch Climate-Smart Agriculture training farms

Dutch Minister for Agriculture Sharon Dijksma and former president Bill Clinton are set to sign a second agreement this weekend to launch new international agriculture projects in Africa to boost food security, strengthen local economies, and combat climate change. The focus will be on training farms and other projects for Climate-Smart Agriculture in Rwanda to help smallholder farmers increase yields. Dutch government investments total $3 million (2.2 million euros).

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Rwanda Food Security Outlook October 2013 to March 2014

KEY MESSAGES

  • Prices for key staple foods rose at an atypical rate between August and September, due to the market impacts of below-average season ‘B’ harvests. On average across the country, September bean prices were 42 percent above last year’s levels. High prices will continue to reduce food access for poor households who are market dependant until the next harvest in December/January.

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Rwanda Bulletin des Prix octobre 2013

Le haricot est la denrée alimentaire la plus consomée dans toutes les régions du Rwanda. Le maïs, le manioc, la pomme de terre, la patate douce at la banane sont aussi importants. Le haricot et le maïs sont normalement cultivés dans tous les districts, la pomme de terre est prédominante au Nord et à l’Ouest du pays et la banane à l’Est. Les prix des denrées alimentaires sont généralement bas en Janvier-Février après les récoltes de la saison A, ainsi qu’en Juillet-Aout après les récoltes de la saison B.

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Rwanda Price Bulletin October 2013

Beans are the most common staple commodities across all regions in Rwanda. Maize, cassava, Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes and bananas are also very important. Beans and Maize are cultivated generally in all districts of the Country, Irish potato mainly in Northern and Western parts of the Country and Banana in Eastern parts. Staple food prices are usually lower in January-February, after season A, and in July-August, following the season B harvest. Prices are higher in October-November and May-June during the lean periods.