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Rwanda Price Bulletin August 2014

Maize, sorghum, wheat, and groundnuts are the most important food commodities in South Sudan. Sorghum, maize, and groundnuts are the staple foods for the poor in most rural areas. Maize flour and wheat (as bread) are more important for middle-income and rich households in urban areas. Sorghum and maize are generally substitutable for one another but preferences are shifting towards maize over time, especially in the southern half of Southern Sudan. Groundnuts are important for the rural poor in Northern Bahr El Ghazal, Warrap, and Lakes states.

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GIEWS Country Brief: Rwanda 25-August-2014

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  • Water deficit during 2014B season affected crop production and livestock body conditions, especially in eastern areas

  • Declining maize and beans prices following the 2014B harvest

  • Minimal levels of food insecurity in most areas of the country

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Rwanda + 1 other
Giving Refugees In Rwanda The Power Of Choice

Fighting in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has resulted in more than 76,000 people seeking refuge in Rwanda. In Gihembe camp, Northern Province, where WFP and its partners are providing assistance to more than 14,500 people, a new cash programme is improving the dietary diversity of the refugees as well as empowering them by giving them the ability to decide for themselves what they eat.

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Rwanda Food Security Outlook - July 2014 to December 2014

Early depletion of household stocks expected to reduce food access in some areas

Key Messages

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Rwanda Price Bulletin July 2014

Beans are the most common staple commodities across all regions in Rwanda. Maize, cassava, Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes and bananas are also very important. Beans and Maize are cultivated generally in all districts of the Country, Irish potatoes mainly in Northern and Western parts of the Country and Bananas in Eastern parts. Staple food prices are usually lower in January-February, after season A, and in July-August, following the season B harvest. Prices are higher in October-November and May-June during the lean periods.

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Supporting Farmer Co-operatives in Rwanda

WFP marks the International day of Co-operatives and commits to invest in capacity building of small-holder farmers through local purchases to achieve sustainable food security.

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Malnutrition a threat with use of climate-resilient crops, scientists say

Report
AlertNet

Author: Isaiah Esipisu

KIGALI, Rwanda (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – As farmers move toward growing crops designed to meet growing world demand for food and stand up to tougher climate conditions, they may inadvertently be worsening malnutrition, scientists say.

Such "hidden hunger" stems from a lack of vitamins and minerals in some crops that replace staple favourites, and a narrowing of the range of foods eaten.

AlertNet:



For more humanitarian news and analysis, please visit www.trust.org/alertnet

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Rwanda Food Security Outlook Update June 2014

Below-average season ‘B’ production increases food insecurity

Key Messages

  • Season B production is expected to be between 25 to 50 percent below-average due to poor seasonal rainfall performance. Continued dry conditions throughout the country will reduce area planted for season C.

  • Although staple food prices have declined in many markets with the beginning of harvests in June, these decreases are likely to remain short-term. Because of production deficits, market supplies will not replenish as they typically do.

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Rwanda Price Bulletin June 2014

Beans are the most common staple commodities across all regions in Rwanda.
Maize, cassava, Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes and bananas are also very important. Beans and Maize are cultivated generally in all districts of the Country, Irish potato mainly in Northern and Western parts of the Country and Banana in Eastern parts. Staple food prices are usually lower in January-February, after season A, and in July-August, following the season B harvest.
Prices are higher in October-November and May-June during the lean periods.

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Rwanda’s agricultural output stagnates for second year in a row

Report
EastAfrican

Rwanda's gains in the agriculture sector could be reversed due to challenges created by climate change and the country’s inability to scale up appropriate interventions like irrigation and provision of sufficient farm implements to farmers.

Last year, agriculture output stagnated at 3 per cent, just like in 2012, while in 2011 the sector only grew by 3 per cent. This year, the government is projecting that the sector will expand by 5 per cent.

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Rwanda Food Security Outlook Update - May 2014

Key Messages

Crop yields from Season B are expected to be below average. Despite on-time planting in early March, below-normal rainfall totals were received from mid-April to the end of May.

Prices of maize remained stable in most markets in April. Bean prices in most markets followed seasonal trends in April but remain well above average in Rukomo and Nyakarambi markets. Below-average Season B harvests in June are expected to put upward pressure on prices.

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GIEWS Country Brief: Rwanda 28-May-2014

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  • Water deficit in most cropping areas likely to affect yields of the 2014B season crops to be harvested by June

  • Maize prices declined following the 2014A harvest and imports from Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania

  • Minimal levels of food insecurity in most areas of the country

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Rwanda + 1 other
MIDIMAR launches 1000 Days nutrition campaign in refugee camps

The Ministry for Disaster Management and Refugee Affairs (MIDIMAR) launched the “1,000-Days in the Thousands Hills” nutrition campaign in refugee camps. The official launch was held in Kiziba camp in Karongi District in the Western province.

The introduction of nutrition campaign in refugee camps is in accordance with the community based integrated approach introduced by MIDIMAR for all services involved in refugee affairs.

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Rwanda: Population Movement (MDRRW010) DREF final report

Summary: CHF 184,200 was allocated from the IFRC’s Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) on 22 August, 2013 to support Rwanda Red Cross Society in delivering immediate assistance to an estimated 10,000 people (up to 2,000 households) in emergency health and care, water, sanitation and hygiene promotion. Of the 2,000 households, up to approximately 1,000 households who had to leave without their belongings were targeted to receive selected non-food items.

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Rwanda + 1 other
DRC Refugees Start A Better Life In Southern Rwanda

Over 7,000 refugees from the Democratic of Congo (DRC) have seen their living conditions improve after staying in the Nkamira transit centre for the last two years. In April, they moved to Mugombwa camp in Southern Rwanda and although they remain dependent on WFP food assistance their life has got better.

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Combining Expertise To Boost Food Security in Rwanda

In the district of Nyamagabe, Southern Rwanda, WFP and the Republic of Korea are combining their knowledge to help over 1,600 people from the most poor and food insecure households to create assets through land terracing and increasing their standards of living by constructing houses, class rooms and clean water channels to the communities.

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Rwanda + 2 others
Rwanda Food Security Outlook April 2014

Stressed food security outcomes observed during the peak of lean season

Key Messages

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Rwanda Price Bulletin April 2014

Beans are the most common staple commodities across all regions in Rwanda. Maize, cassava, Irish potatoes, sweet potatoes and bananas are also very important. Beans and Maize are cultivated generally in all districts of the Country, Irish potato mainly in Northern and Western parts of the Country and Banana in Eastern parts. Staple food prices are usually lower in January-February, after season A, and in July-August, following the season B harvest. Prices are higher in October-November and May-June during the lean periods.

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Rwandan Genocide: Repairing Hope

During 100 horrifying days in 1994, approximately 800,000 Tutsi people were systematically killed in what is now known as the Rwandan Genocide. The massacre left many surviving children, such as 6-year-old Liberatha Ingabrire, as the heads of their families.

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Rwanda Food Security Outlook Update March 2014

Below-average food stocks and start of season B for most households

Key Messages

Season A harvests are complete across most of the country. Production of beans, maize, Irish potato, and wheat were generally 20-30 percent below normal due to poor rainfall performance.