Zika virus, Microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome Situation Report, 29 December 2016

Report
from World Health Organization
Published on 29 Dec 2016 View Original

KEY UPDATES

  • Countries and territories reporting mosquito-borne Zika virus infections for the first time in the past week:
    None

  • Countries and territories reporting microcephaly and other central nervous system (CNS) malformations potentially associated with Zika virus infection for the first time in the past week:
    None

  • Countries and territories reporting Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) cases associated with Zika virus infection for the first time in the past week:
    Saint Martin

ANALYSIS

  • Overall, the global risk assessment has not changed. Zika virus continues to spread geographically to areas where competent vectors are present. Although a decline in cases of Zika infection has been reported in some countries, or in some parts of countries, vigilance needs to remain high.

SITUATION

  • Seventy-five countries and territories (Fig. 1, Table 1) have reported evidence of mosquitoborne Zika virus transmission since 2007 (69 with reports from 2015 onwards), of which:

    • Fifty-eight with a reported outbreak from 2015 onwards (Fig. 2, Table 1).
    • Seven with having possible endemic transmission or evidence of local mosquitoborne Zika infections in 2016.
    • Ten with evidence of local mosquito-borne Zika infections in or before 2015, but without documentation of cases in 2016, or with the outbreak terminated.
  • Thirteen countries have reported evidence of person-to-person transmission of Zika virus (Table 2).

  • Twenty-nine countries or territories have reported microcephaly and other CNS malformations potentially associated with Zika virus infection, or suggestive of congenital infection (Table 3).

  • Twenty-one countries or territories have reported an increased incidence of GBS and/or laboratory confirmation of a Zika virus infection among GBS cases (Table 4).