Syrian Arab Republic Situation Report – July 2017

IN NUMBERS

6.9 million people food insecure and 3.1 million at risk

2 in 5 people are on the move inside the country

USD 111.36 million funding gap for FAO’s 2017 Humanitarian Response Plan

KEY MESSAGES

  • Food security in parts of Syria has slightly improved, but the overall situation remains far worse than before the crisis.

  • Approximately 6.9 million people are food insecure and a further 3.1 million are at risk of food insecurity, as asset depletion strategies are being adopted to meet consumption needs.

  • According to the latest Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission (CFSAM) conducted by FAO and WFP, total wheat production is estimated at 1.8 million tonnes – 12 percent more than last year’s record low but still much less than half of the pre-conflict ten-year average. Livestock herd sizes have stabilized, albeit at very low levels.

  • Two in five people are on the move inside Syria, with 6.3 million internally displaced. However, 440 000 people have returned to their home areas owing to the improved security situation in parts of the country.

  • Improved security within the country and reopening of supply routes led to the slow recovery of trade and functioning urban markets. In parts of eastern Aleppo city, markets that were destroyed are slowly recovering.
    Food prices continue to be very high compared to 2-3 years ago, but have slightly decreased in parts of the country compared to the previous year.

  • Humanitarian access continues to be heavily constrained. According to the CFSAM, improvements in humanitarian access have been reported compared with last year, however the situation in Ar-Raqqa remains critical

CURRENT SITUATION

Approximately 6.9 million people are food insecure and a further 3.1 million are at risk of food insecurity, as asset depletion strategies are being adopted to meet consumption needs. In a country with a population of 18.5 million people, only 3.5 million Syrians are reported to be food secure. Two in five people are on the move inside the country. Over half of Syria’s population have fled their homes, including 6.3 million internally displaced people (IDPs). The improved security situation in parts of the country has allowed the return of 440 000 people. Still, the continuing crisis has led to new displacements, with seven out of 14 governorates encountering an increased number of IDPs compared with the start of the year. The most frequently reported reasons for displacement included the deterioration of security, exacerbated economic conditions and the absence of basic services as well as the need for better livelihood opportunities.

Some 50 percent of households reduced the number of meals and more than 30 percent restrict adult consumption to prioritize children. The food shortage in the country has pushed Syrians to exercise a high level of food coping strategies. A significant majority of households have depleted their assets and are unable to cope. Displaced households continue to engage in negative coping mechanisms, such as child labour and early drop-outs of school. While food insecurity is stabilizing in Government-controlled areas, households in hard-to-reach and besieged areas as well as IDPs report severe conditions, with over 30 percent of households having poor consumption behaviours (quality and quantity), most notably women-headed and large households.

Humanitarian access continues to be heavily constrained. According to the latest CFSAM, improvements in humanitarian access have been reported compared with last year. Nonetheless, access still remains to be worryingly constrained in Deir-ez-Zor and Ar-Raqqa governorates. While the air-drops marginally improved the humanitarian situation in Deir-ez-Zor, the situation in Ar-Raqqa remains critical as the fighting and airstrikes continue. Shops have been destroyed and the price of a standard food basket has sharply increased by 42 percent in May–June 2017.