South Sudan Humanitarian Bulletin Issue 3 | 17 February 2017

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Humanitarian organizations will target some 5.8 million people across South Sudan with humanitarian assistance and protection in 2017.

  • Displaced people arrive in Kodok and in Aburoc following clashes on the western bank of the River Nile in and around Wau Shilluk.

  • Displacement, loss of property and violations against civilians reported by people displaced by fighting in parts of Nasir.

  • High needs reported amongst the conflict-affected population in Ngo Halima and Ngisa in the Greater Baggari area, in Wau County.

FIGURES

No. of Internally Displaced People - 1.89 million

No. of refugees in neighboring countries 1.5 million

No. of people assisted in 2016 (as of 31 Dec) - 5.1

$1.6 billion needed to provide life-saving assistance and protection to 5.8 million people

Humanitarian organizations have appealed for US$1.6 billion to provide life-saving assistance and protection to 5.8 million people Humanitarian organizations have appealed for US$1.6 billion to provide life-saving assistance and protection to 5.8 million people across South Sudan under the 2017 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP).

“The humanitarian situation in South Sudan has deteriorated dramatically due to the devastating combination of conflict, economic decline and climatic shocks,” said Mr. Eugene Owusu, the Humanitarian Coordinator for South Sudan. “In 2017, we are facing unprecedented needs, in an unprecedented number of locations, and these needs will increase during the upcoming lean season.” Humanitarian organizations estimate that some 7.5 million people across South Sudan are in need of humanitarian assistance and protection in 2017. Since the conflict began in December 2013, about 3.4 million people have been forced to flee their homes.

Horrendous atrocities have been reported, including widespread sexual violence, and food insecurity and malnutrition have skyrocketed. According to food security experts, the risk of famine is real for thousands of people in conflict-affected communities and fooddeficit areas. “With needs rising rapidly, we have rigorously prioritized the 2017 Humanitarian Response Plan to target those who most urgently require assistance and protection,” said Mr. Owusu. “It is imperative that this appeal is funded early, and funded fully, so that the aid workers deployed across South Sudan can respond robustly and rapidly.” In South Sudan, humanitarian organizations use the window of opportunity provided by the dry season to deliver supplies by road. When the rains set in, usually in May, most roads become impassable and supplies must be delivered by air. This multiplies the cost of the humanitarian operation, which is one of the largest and most complex in the world.

“In 2016, we reached more than 5 million people, but the crisis deepened and spread as conflict continued. In 2017, we are determined to reach more people, but we urgently need the funding to do so,” said Mr. Owusu. “I appeal to the international community, which has given so generously to this young country, to support us now. If we fail to act swiftly, lives may be lost

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:

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