Nigeria Humanitarian Sitrep No. 8, 16 - 30 April 2017

Report
from UN Children's Fund
Published on 30 Apr 2017

Highlights

  • IOM DTM Round XV (March 2017) estimates, a total of 1.69 million people are still internally displaced across the three northeastern states of Adamawa, Borno and Yobe, of which, 84 per cent are in Borno alone.

  • In the first 3 weeks of April, the IOM Emergency Tracking Tool (ETT) no. 11 reports the arrival of over 6,800 new IDPs in Bama, Dikwa, Damboa,
    Kukawa, Ngala and Gowza.

  • A total of 1.46 million people have been reached with integrated PHC services in camps and host communities in 2017, of which 195,287 were reached during this reporting period.

  • In Yobe, 168 cases of meningitis have been reported with 24 deaths and in Borno, there is one suspected case reported. In Adamawa state, apart from the three cases of meningitis isolated in the early week of April 2017, no further case has been identified.

  • A total of 50,585 under five children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) have been admitted into the therapeutic feeding program (16 per cent of 314,557 sector target for 2017), of which 9,789 children with SAM were admitted during the reporting period.

  • UNICEF in collaboration with the Borno State Ministry of Women Affairs and Social Development (MWASD) documented and provided interim care services for 446 persons released by the Nigerian Army on 10 April.

Situation in Numbers

8.5 million
Projected number of people in need of humanitarian assistance in the north east states of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe for 2017 (Humanitarian Response Plan, 2017)

1.69 million IDPs in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states, over 56 per cent are children (DTM Round XV, March 2017)

4.4 million
Children in need of humanitarian assistance (HAC 2017)

UNICEF Appeal 2017
US$ 146.9 million
*Humanitarian Action for Children (HAC), does not include inaccessible areas of Borno

Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

IOM DTM Round XV (March 2017) estimates, a total of 1.69 million people are still internally displaced across the three northeastern states of Adamawa, Borno and Yobe, of which, 84 per cent are in Borno alone. Children represent 56 per cent of the total IDP population and nine per cent are infants under a year old. The number of identified returnees has increased to 1.15 million people1. Food remains greatest unmet priority need cited by 69 per cent of IDPs surveyed in sites, followed by nonfood items at 16 per cent.

In the first 3 weeks of April, the IOM Emergency Tracking Tool (ETT) no. 11 reported the arrival of over 6,800 new IDPs in Bama, Dikwa, Damboa, Kukawa, Ngala and Gowza. Since January, various reports from field confirm the arrival of over 11,300 people in Pulka, close to the Cameroonian border, bringing the total population of the town to more than 42,000, causing overcrowding and placing further pressure on already overstretched resources. To cope with the increased population the military is opening a new camp, however, availability of water resources to cater to this number of people remains a concern.

In Rann (Kala Balge), people continue to arrive daily and the town's population has grown by at least 10,000 in the past three months. Spontaneous movements of populations continue almost daily due to attacks by Boko Haram, military operations, returns from neighboring countries and people searching for food and basic services.

Mobbar/Damasak has a population of around 70,000 people in need, Kukawa/Baga around 20,000 people, Ngala around 224,000 and Bama/Banki has over 3,000 people who have returned since February 2017. Kala Balge/Rann has a population of 51,690 with around 5,000 new arrivals since 21 March. It is expected that the numbers of new arrivals will increase due to an intensification of military operations before the rainy season sets in as well as a continuing influx of returnees from neighboring countries. The Nigerian government is considering a tripartite meeting with the Cameroonian government and UNHCR to address the issue of returns from Cameroon.

In Borno, the first suspected case of meningitis was reported in Shuwari IDP camp Maiduguri. In Yobe, as of week 15, there are 168 cases with 24 deaths (14.28 per cent death rate) and a total of 13 out of 17 LGAs have been affected. In Adamawa, apart from the three cases of meningitis identified early April 2017, no other case has been identified since.

UNICEF together with MSF France carried out an assessment in Dikwa on the 17th to 20th April 2017. The key findings show that an additional 3,606 latrines and 1,340 showers are needed to bring the sites up to SPHERE standards as well as severe gaps in safe water provision. A Mid-Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) screening of 7,346 children under 5 was carried out with 681 identified with SAM and 2,263 with MAM. Due to the influx of new arrivals the number of children has significantly increased and access to child protection and education services is difficult. Out of the 65,000 children expected to be in school, only 13% (8,500) of school aged children are enrolled and accessing education and in the informal camps visited there were no child protection actors. UNICEF supports three clinics in Dikwa town and the construction of the fourth clinic in Bulabulin has been completed and will soon commence operations. Thirteen skilled staff (a doctor, 4 nurses, 2 midwives and 6 CHW) provide services in the three sites, this is insufficient for the growing population. There is also a need to expand outreach services to informal settlements where currently there are no medical services. UNICEF is working on follow up actions and recommendations with partners to further strengthen humanitarian response in Dikwa.