Iraq: Mosul Humanitarian Response Situation Report No. 37 (5 to 11 June 2017) [EN/AR]

Report
from UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Published on 11 Jun 2017

Highlights

  • Throughout the past week, and as per previous trends, displacement has continued from the western side of Mosul city. According to the government’s Ministry of Migration and Displaced (MoMD), since the start of the western Mosul operation on 19 February 2017, a total of 678,177 people have fled western Mosul as of 11 June.

  • Since the Mosul operation began on 17 October 2016, 854,327 people have been cumulatively displaced from Mosul city as of 11 June. Humanitarian partner’s original upper level estimate regarding the number of people who would be affected was one million people.

  • Concerns remain for the protection of civilians in the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL)-controlled areas of western Mosul city.

  • According to the Government of Iraq, approximately 14,000 IDPs from Baaj district, west of Mosul district, have arrived at Hammam al Alil screening site since 5 June. The IDPs have then been transferred to a number of different camps in Ninewa. This IDP movement is the result of hostilities further west of the Tal Afar area, towards the Syrian border.

  • As the rate of trauma injuries remains of concern, in support of the government's Ministry of Health, humanitarian partners have scaled up their emergency response capacity, in and around the broader Mosul city area, in terms of trauma stabilisation, surgical care, primary health care (PHC) and medical referral capacity.

Situation Overview

Displacement from western Mosul city has continued throughout the week. According to MoMD, over 48,000 people have passed through Hammam al Alil screening sites and other sites since 5 June – this is an increase of nearly 50 per cent in displacement outflows when compared to the previous week. Between 3,500 to 8,400 people fled, per day, over the period 5 to 11 June.

Humanitarian partner’s original upper level estimate regarding the number of people who would be impacted by the fighting for Mosul city was one million people, of whom 750,000 would require direct assistance. Since the Mosul operation began on 17 October 2016, cumulatively, 854,327 people have been displaced from the city as of 11 June according to MoMD. Since the start of the western Mosul operation on 19 February, a total of 678,177 people have fled western Mosul city. As of the end of May, 177,483 people returned to Mosul city - 42,246 people returned to western Mosul, while 135,237 people returned to eastern Mosul – leaving 676,844 people from Mosul city currently displaced.

Humanitarian and protection needs remain severe, both among displaced families and vulnerable residents of newly accessible areas. While humanitarian partners continue to respond to the outflow of people providing emergency assistance – including shading, ready-to-eat meals, water, sanitation facilities, and medical and protection services – capacities are being stretched, and funding concerns are being reported in some areas, such as water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and health.

Wherever possible, efforts continue to be made to undertake assessment missions in newly accessible areas, followed by distribution of emergency assistance. Equally, humanitarian partners continue to aim to reach those who remained in their homes. Concerns persist in terms of the protection of civilians in ISIL-controlled areas of western Mosul. Continual reports of food insecurity, lack of safe drinking water and medicines are being received and tens of thousands of people are remaining in the old city area and the neighbourhoods immediately north of the old city.

Following displacement routes in Mosul city, ten assembly areas, mustering points and screening sites remain in place. Over 9 and 10 June, 1,300 IDPs arrived from western Mosul’s Zanjili’s neighbourhood to the mustering point and screening site at Mosul Woods on the east side of the Tigris river – this is the largest number of IDPs to date who have reached this screening site at any one time.

According to the Government of Iraq, approximately 14,000 IDPs from Baaj district have arrived at Hammam al Alil screening site since 5 June following intensified hostilities further west of Tel Afar area towards the Syrian border. People have then been transferred to Haj Ali, Khazer M1, Qayyarah Jad'ah 5, Qayyarah Airstrip and As-Salamiyah camps in Ninewa. Some 8,000 individuals have so far been registered at As-Salamiyah 2 camps and 5,500 individuals have been registered at the Ja’dah camps in Qayyarah.

In addition to these movements, information has been received that further groups – up to 10,000 people – from the Tel Afar area are expected to come south towards Tal Jarabiyah village, in Baaj district. However, as services are reportedly lacking in Tal Jarabiyah, especially around the provision of water, people are reportedly moving towards Hammam al Alil screening site. Reportedly, and due to lack of water, dead and dying livestock in the Tal Jarabiyah area was spotted.

Camp construction and site expansion continue to ensure enough capacity exists to accommodate newly displaced people. According to the Camp Coordination and Camp Management cluster, 8,234 fully-serviced family plots were available for immediate use at 19 different sites as of 11 June, where 308,382 people were currently being sheltered.

The re-establishment of a functioning city-wide water network remains a key concern. The daily provision of water into Mosul city remains steady at 6.4 million litres – with some 2.78 million litres being trucked and delivered to western Mosul city, and some 3.62 million litres being tankered to eastern Mosul city.

The rate of trauma injuries continues to be of serious concern. Since October last year, and as of 10 June, 14,039 people from Mosul city were referred into the established trauma pathway, which covers from stabilization to surgical and post-op care. Since February, and from western Mosul city alone, some 7,906 people were referred into the trauma pathway. Since the start of the western Mosul operation in February, and as of 10 June, 3,387 people were treated at Trauma Stabilisation Points near the frontline areas of western Mosul city. Partners’ capacity to provide trauma stabilization and surgical care in and around Mosul remains critical in terms of the provision of life-saving interventions, especially as potentially heavy caseloads following the final push for the fighting in Mosul’s old city are expected.

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