Iraq: Mosul Humanitarian Response Situation Report No. 34 (15 May to 21 May 2017) [EN/AR/KU]

Report
from UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Published on 21 May 2017
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This report is produced by OCHA Iraq in collaboration with humanitarian partners. This document is subject to availability of data at the time of circulation. Also, and as the context rapidly evolves, information in this report is subject to constant change, with figures and locations listed which may no longer be current at the time of issuance/reading. The next report will be issued on or around 29 May 2017.

Highlights

  • Throughout the week, people have continued to be displaced from the western side of the Mosul city. On Thursday 18 May, the number of people fleeing western Mosul peaked when some 16,100 individuals passed through the Hammam al Alil screening site, according to Government’s figures. This is the largest official daily movement of people since the Mosul operation began on 17 October 2016.

  • As of 21 May, according to the Iraqi authorities 551,223 individuals have fled western Mosul since 19 February 2017, representing an increase of 14.6 per cent over the last week. The current number of IDPs from western Mosul who remain displaced is 516,382 people, taking into account reported returns of 34,841 people to western Mosul, as of 16 May. The Government of Iraq reports that as of 21 May, 727,373 people have been displaced from Mosul city since the beginning of Mosul operations on 17 October 2016. Serious concerns remain for the protection of civilians in ISIL-controlled areas of western Mosul, where in the old city alone approximately 200,000 people are estimated to be living.

  • High rates of trauma injuries continue to remain of significant humanitarian concern. Between 17 October 2016 and 20 May 2017, some 12,500 people were transferred to hospitals for emergency medical treatment, 6,369 people from western Mosul alone. Since the start of the Mosul operation in February 2017 and as of 12 May, 2,479 people were treated at Trauma Stabilisation Points (TSPs) near the frontline areas of western Mosul.

Situation Overview

Throughout the week, people have continued to be displaced from the western side of the Mosul city. On Thursday 18 May, the number of people fleeing western Mosul peaked when some 16,100 individuals passed through the Hammam al Alil screening site, according to Government’s figures. This is the largest official daily movement of people since the Mosul operation began on 17 October 2016.

As of 21 May, according to the Iraqi authorities 551,223 individuals have fled western Mosul since 19 February 2017, representing an increase of 14.6 per cent over the last week. The current number of IDPs from western Mosul who remain displaced is 516,382 people, taking into account reported returns of 34,841 people to western Mosul, as of 17 May. The Government of Iraq reports that, as of 21 May, 727,373 people have been displaced from Mosul city since the beginning of Mosul operations on 17 October 2016. Serious concerns remain for the protection of civilians in ISIL-controlled areas of western Mosul, where in the old city alone approximately 200,000 people are estimated to be living.

As of 21 May, the mustering point for displaced people in western Mosul’s Yarmouk/Risala area is no longer in use. Three new mustering points have reportedly been established in the neighbourhoods of Haramat, Matahin/Abar and in the Doors and Windows Industrial area south-west of Scorpion Junction, and at al-Majmua al Thaqafiya, to adjust to new displacement routes used by people fleeing the city. At these mustering points, humanitarian partners are providing emergency assistance, including ready-to-eat meals, water, sanitation facilities, medical services and shading. In addition, and wherever possible, efforts are being made to undertake assessment missions in newly accessible areas close to the front lines, followed by distribution of emergency assistance. Since 17 October 2016, emergency response packages of food, water and hygiene items have been distributed to meet the immediate humanitarian needs of 2,874,000 people.

Camp construction and site expansion continues to accelerate to meet humanitarian needs. According to the Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) Cluster, some 326,230 (62,811 families) are currently being sheltered in camps and emergency sites, with the remainder in host communities and informal sites. As of 21 May, there are currently 8,648 fully-serviced family plots available for immediate use at 19 different locations.

People continue to flee under difficult circumstances, which are exacerbated by high temperatures. Many people living in ISIL-controlled are food insecure and have not had access to safe drinking water and medicines for weeks or months. Humanitarians continue to respond to the extremely fast outflows of people, but the pace and scale of displacement is stretching response capacities. Wherever conditions and access allow, humanitarians also aim to reach those who stayed in their homes, and those who are returning to retaken areas.

Water remains a significant humanitarian concern in Mosul city, particularly in western Mosul, as many people reportedly continue to drink from unsafe and untreated water sources. In eastern Mosul, humanitarian partners continue to tanker some 3.1 million litres of drinking water per day, while in western Mosul humanitarian partners are delivering some 1.4 million litres of drinking water per day.

High rates of trauma injuries continue to remain of significant humanitarian concern. Between 17 October 2016 and 20 May 2017, some 12,500 people were transferred to hospitals for emergency medical treatment, of which 6,369 people from western Mosul alone. Since the start of the Mosul operation in February 2017 and as of 12 May, 2,479 people were treated at Trauma Stabilisation Points (TSPs) near the frontline areas of western Mosul.

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:

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