Iraq: Mosul Humanitarian Response Situation Report No. 32 (1 May to 7 May 2017) [EN/AR/KU]

Report
from UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Published on 07 May 2017
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Highlights

  • Following the reintensification of hostilities on 4 May, nearly 11,000 individuals from western Mosul had passed through the Hammam al Alil screening site by 7 May, according to Government figures.

  • As of 7 May, the number of people who have fled western Mosul city since 19 February had risen to 434,775 individuals, according to the Iraqi authorities. The number of IDPs from western Mosul city who currently remain displaced is 403,490 people, taking into account the return of 30,510 people to western Mosul city, as of 30 April.

  • Trauma casualty rates across Mosul are high. Since 17 October last year, health care partners report over 12,081 people have been referred to hospitals in Mosul and neighbouring Governorates, nearly half of those cases reported were from western Mosul alone. At Trauma Stabilization Points (TSPs) in western Mosul, some 1,971 people have been treated for trauma injuries, of which 335 were immediately life-threatening.

2,612,311 People potentially reached in and out of camps with emergency response packages of food, water and hygiene items (since 17 October)

1,314,769 People outside of camps reached with WASH support (since 17 October)

835,843 People have received medical consultations (since 17 October)

615,150 People displaced by the Mosul Operation as of 7 May, according to the Government of Iraq

796,069 People have received NFI kits (since 17 October)

6,561 Fully serviced plots currently available for immediate use in 19 camps and emergency sites, as of 7 May

Situation Overview

Clashes between the Iraqi Security Forces (ISF) and the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), continued in the northwest of Mosul this week, significantly impacting the humanitarian situation. Following the re-intensification of hostilities on 4 May, nearly 11,000 individuals from western Mosul had passed through the Hammam al Alil screening site by 7 May, according to Government figures. Many families began arriving at the newly established Badoush Mustering Point, northeast of Mosul city along the Syrian Highway, where humanitarian partners provided emergency assistance, including ready to eat food and water. Humanitarian partners continue to provide basic services at the Badoush mustering site, including shelter, WASH, protection and health services.

As of 7 May, the number of people who had fled western Mosul has risen to 434,775 individuals, according to the Iraqi authorities, since the start of military operations on 19 February. The current number of IDPs from western Mosul city who remain displaced is 403,490 people, taking into account the return of 30,510 people to western Mosul city, as of 30 April. The Government of Iraq reports that since the beginning of Mosul operations on 16 October 2016, more than 610,000 people have been displaced cumulatively from Mosul city. Serious concerns remain for the protection of civilians in the west of the city, where approximately 360,000 people are still living in ISIL-controlled areas.

Camp construction and site expansion is accelerating to meet the humanitarian needs of people newly displaced from western Mosul city. According to the CCCM Cluster, some 324,938 people (69,270 families) are currently being sheltered in camps and emergency sites, with the remainder in host communities and informal sites. As of 7 May, there are currently 6,561 fully serviced plots available for immediate use in 19 different locations. Some 3,791 plots are available in the nine priority sites, and the remaining 2,770 are in 10 other sites.

The Nimrud bridge, 30 km south of Mosul, has been closed since 2 May as a result of high water levels,caused by heavy rains in catchment areas necessitating the strategic release of water from Mosul Dam. The Qayyarah Bridge (60 km south of Mosul), however, remains open though authorities have warned that it could close if rising water levels necessitate. Humanitarian actors have prepositioned supplies on the western side of the Tigris River to offset any disruption of assistance delivery. OCHA remains in close contact with authorities regarding the status of the bridges in order to minimize the impact on humanitarian services. l Water continues to remain a significant humanitarian concern in Mosul city. In eastern Mosul city water shortages persist and humanitarian partners continue to truck3.1 million litres of water per day. In Hammam al Alil 1 camp, water is still being provided through water tankering, complemented by bottled water. UNICEF has mobilized a water treatment unit to deliver an additional 50m³ per day to cover the water shortfall in the camp. There are also plans by UNICEF to locate an interim water treatment plant in the Abu Saif area of western Mosul to provide an additional water source for tankering until the water treatment plant in affected areas has been rehabilitated.

Health care partners continue to warn that limited access to safe water for people inside and outside camps poses a risk for outbreaks of waterborne and vector-borne diseases such as acute watery diarrhoea.

Providing comprehensive primary health care services to affected people in newly accessible areas remains a priority. Health partners reported a total of 38,063 medical consultations during the last week, 8,163 of which were provided to children under the age of five. Some 379 emergency referrals were made, of which 70 cases were referred due to pregnancy or delivery related complications. Some 183 consultations for mental health or psychosocial support were also provided. The Health Cluster is also addressing the issue of scabies incamps by ensuring medicines are available and developing Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials for distribution in the camps.

Health care partners also reported that nutrition screening has been undertaken over the past two months at IDP camps receiving children aged six to 59 months from western Mosul. Out of 12,164 children screened, 202 children were identified with Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) and 448 with Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM), were referred for management and treatment using nutrition therapies at Primary Health Care facilities (PHCs) in the camps. Nutrition screening continues on a regular basis, as new IDPs arrive in camps.

Trauma casualty rates across Mosul are high. Since 17 October last year, health care partners report over 12,081 people have been referred to hospitals in Mosul and neighbouring Governorates, nearly half of these reported cases were from western Mosul alone. At Trauma Stabilization Points (TSPs) some 1,971 people have been treated for trauma injuries, of which 335 were immediately life-threatening.

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:

To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit http://unocha.org/.