Iraq: Mosul Humanitarian Response Situation Report No. 24 (6 March - 12 March 2017) [EN/KU/AR]

Report
from UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Published on 13 Mar 2017

Highlights

  • The week from 6 March to 12 March 2017 saw approximately 18,100 people displaced from western Mosul due to military operations. In total, approximately 69,000 people have been displaced from western Mosul into camps and emergency sites according to the Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM). According to the government figures, the total of West Mosul displaced stands at 92,035 people.

  • Available camp capacity has kept pace with people being newly displaced from western Mosul. As of the evening of 12 March, 6,052 fully serviced plots were available for immediate occupation in camps north and east of Mosul city.
    Camp construction and site expansion, and the installation of water and sanitation services, is rapidly accelerating across camps and emergency sites.

  • Trauma casualty rates in Mosul are high. Between 18 February and 8 March, at least 744 people have been treated for conflict-related injuries at Trauma Stabilization Points (TSPs) near frontline areas of western Mosul city.

  • Significant shortages of drinking water continue to be a major humanitarian concern in eastern Mosul city. Civilians in many neighbourhoods in the southern and western parts of western Mosul city also have no access to the public network and are potentially accessing untreated drinking water. The re-establishment of a functioning city-wide water network is a key priority.

Situation Overview

The week from 6 March to 12 March 2017 saw approximately 18,100 people displaced from western Mosul due to military operations between the Iraqi Security Forces (ISF) and the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), which resumed in western Mosul on 19 February. Since the west Mosul operation began, as of 12 March approximately 69,000 people have been displaced into camps and emergency sites according the DTM. According to the government figures, the total of West Mosul displaced stands at 92,035 people. IOM is undertaking efforts to better understand and address the discrepancy between UN and government figures. Emergency packages of food and water have been distributed to all arrivals at the Hammam al Alil security screening site, and water is also being distributed at muster points.

Between 17 October 2016 and 11 March 2017, accumulatively 292,848 people have been displaced from Mosul, of whom 68,550 people have returned to their areas of origin, according to the DTM. As on 11 March, there are approximately 224,298 people living in displacement sites and camps as a result of the Mosul humanitarian crisis, the highest number of people living in displacement since hostilities began.

Displaced people from western Mosul have predominantly moved through muster points on the outskirts of the city in Abu Saif, Al Aqrab junction (also known as Scorpion Junction) and Tal Kaysum, to Hammam al Alil where security screening is undertaken. Families, however, after clearing the muster points also disperse to non-camp locations. Emergency food and water are distributed to all people passing through the screening site. Following screening, people have been relocated this week to emergency sites in Hajj Ali and Qayyarah Airstrip, to Jad’ah, Khazer and Hasansham camps, and to Chamakor camp, which has been opened this week especially to accommodate people from west Mosul. All people accommodated in camps or emergency sites have received a tented plot, basic household supplies, hygiene kits, and 30-day food rations. In the latter half of the week, at least 10,800 people were also transported to Gogachly and registered by the municipality, where they have been hosted by resident families or sheltered in empty buildings. Humanitarian partners will assess the humanitarian needs of people relocated to eastern Mosul city in the coming days.

Available camp capacity has kept pace with people being newly displaced from western Mosul. As of the evening of 12 March, 6,052 fully serviced plots were available for immediate occupation in camps north and east of Mosul city. Camp construction and site expansion, and the installation of water and sanitation services, is rapidly accelerating across camps and emergency sites.

Serious concerns remain for the protection of approximately 750,000-800,000 civilians who, prior to the conflict, were estimated to be living in the west of the city, where food, medicine, basic household commodities and fuel are running low. Given the narrow streets and high population density in western Mosul city, civilians are at great risk of being caught in crossfire, and infrastructure is likely to sustain damage.

Significant shortages of drinking water continue to be a major humanitarian concern in eastern Mosul city. Civilians in many neighbourhoods in the southern and western parts of western Mosul city also have no access to the public network and are potentially accessing untreated drinking water. The re-establishment of a functioning city-wide water network is a key priority.

Trauma casualty rates across Mosul are high. Since the military operation in western Mosul began on 19 February, over 744 people have been treated at Trauma Stabilization Points for conflict-related injuries.

According to the Government’s Joint Coordination and Monitoring Centre (JCMC), between 20 February and 3 March, the Ministry of Migration and Displacement (MoMD) distributed food and non-food items to IDPs in Khazer, Hasansham, Jad’ah, Madraj, Hajj Ali, Debaga and Hammam al Alil camps and emergency sites and in Rfeila,
Jeren, and Al Hamza villages, as well as the screening sites in Hammam al Alil. This assistance includes 9,237 dry food parcels, 5,936 health kits, 2,680 kitchen sets, 7,637 ground mats, 4,396 kerosene heaters, and 3,500 water sets.

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:

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