Human rights: situation in Djibouti and Nigeria

Report
from European Union
Published on 04 Jul 2013 View Original

Parliament passed two separate resolutions on Thursday calling for the respect of human, civil and political rights in Djibouti and condemning the escalation of violence on the part of Boko Haram in Nigeria.

Situation in Djibouti

MEPs condemn the acts of sexual violence against women in Djibouti and call on the Djibouti authorities to put an end to the repression of political adversaries and release everybody who is being detained on political grounds. It says they must immediately open a judicial investigation into the actions of the police and army during demonstrations and punish the perpetrators of human rights violations.

Human rights must be guaranteed and civil and political rights and freedoms must be safeguarded, including the right to demonstrate peacefully and freedom of the press, add MEPs. The situation in Djibouti will be closely monitored and the EP "is willing to propose restrictive measures in the event of a breach of the Cotonou Agreement, and in particular of Articles 8 and 9 thereof" concerning political dialogue and human rights, democratic principles, the rule of law and good governance.

Situation in Nigeria

MEPs strongly condemn the escalation of violence on the part of Boko Haram and the disproportionate use of force by the Nigerian military in the clashes, particularly in the raids on Baga in mid-April.

The government should prevent further escalation of conflict and both the Nigerian Government and Boko Haram should recognise the freedom of the press and media say MEPs. They urge the Nigerian government to use peaceful means to resolve differences between religious and ethnic groups and call for over-general and simplistic explanations for the conflict based on religion alone to be avoided.

Parliament condemns the execution of Daniel Nsofor for crimes committed when he was under 18 years of age as well as the execution of four prisoners in June 2013. It deeply regrets the adoption of the act making it a crime to be in a same-sex relationship, to support the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people, to operate a gay-friendly venue or to display affection between two people of the same sex.