Funding the transition, a major innovation for the humanitarian community in DR Congo

Report
from UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Published on 19 Mar 2013

(Kinshasa, 19 March 2013): The Common Humanitarian Fund of the Democratic Republic of Congo has allocated USD 70 million to United Nations agencies and non-governmental organizations, traditionally specialized in emergency interventions, to finance long-term projects, a major innovation for the DRC, a country that is plagued with a multi- faceted and complex humanitarian crisis.

After years of responding only to emergencies, humanitarian organizations will now be able to develop multi-year projects, so called “humanitarian transition projects” with a maximum duration of 24 months. This innovation will allow emergency actors to tackle root causes beyond dealing with consequences, and to build resilience of assisted communities. The new approach will also provide opportunities to build the capacity of local NGOs.

$11.8 million has been allocated to food security, a sector that has historically figured among the largest recipients of aid in a country with more than 6.4 million people in food security and livelihoods crisis. The non-food items and emergency shelter sector and water, hygiene and sanitation sector have each received more than $10 million respectively. This first allocation should allow eight million people to receive emergency aid.

In 2012, the Common Fund, better known as the “Pooled Fund” in reference to donors putting their contributions together, has allocated $88.9 million to 152 projects, 58% of the funding was channeled to NGOs. Since its inception in 2006, the Fund has received $764 million from Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Spain, Ireland, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The combined contributions have allowed the humanitarian community to provide emergency assistance to around eight million people every year across the country.

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