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Fresh Water in a Village Called Death

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Pulitzer Center

Lake Victoria is the second-largest freshwater lake in the world, and it is at Agnes Nansubuga's front door in the village of Walumbe. So naturally, that's where she used to fetch her drinking water. Unfortunately, it is also a place that many of her fellow villagers also use as a bathroom. When she drank water from the lake, "I used to get stomach pains," she says.

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Turkmen from Amerli Describe Survival of Islamic State Siege

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Pulitzer Center

SEBASTIAN MEYER

Residents recall their experiences

KIRKUK, Iraq—Over the past few weeks, hundreds of Shi'ite Turkmen have fled the town of Amerli seeking refuge in the northern city of Kirkuk. Despite recent military gains after U.S. airstrikes that were coordinated with Iraqi and Kurdish forces, the situation remains dire for Amerli’s residents.

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Jordan + 3 others
Jordan's Quiet Emergency

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Pulitzer Center

ALICE SU

When the adhan sounds, a sigh of relief ripples across the room. The call to prayer marks the end of the day’s Ramadan fasting and the go-ahead for seven disabled children, six volunteers, one grandmother, and two supervisors, all from Syria, to dig into the mountain of McDonald’s in front of them.

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Survivors of Sexual Violence Find Hope and a New Start

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Pulitzer Center

KEM KNAPP SAWYER

GOMA, Democratic Republic of Congo — Yolande, dressed in a bright pink T-shirt, denim skirt and pink sandals, is holding her bright-eyed 2-year-old. The noon sun is shining and the air is warm. Yolande carries her little girl over to the yellow pail in the courtyard to join the other toddlers for a bath. The children are splashing the soapy water in and out of the pail—they’re having fun.

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Bangladesh: Before the Flood

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Pulitzer Center

KENNETH R. WEISS

DHAKA, Bangladesh — Dobir Uddin remembers sitting on the riverbank near his farm in southern Bangladesh, admiring the puffy clouds scuttling across a big sky, the feel of a rain-scrubbed breeze on his face. Raindrops would lure fish from the river's depths. If he sat still, very still, he could catch one with his bare hands.

"I had everything at home," Uddin says, sitting on the bed of his one-room shanty in a Dhaka slum. Now, he says, he feels like he's "trapped in a cage."