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Nigeria’s air ambulance firm is a leap forward for healthcare

Report
Guardian

Company set up by young British-Nigerian medic boosts healthcare with its 20 aircraft and ‘flying doctors’

Dr Ola Orekunrin has delivered the healthcare innovation that Nigeria’s government has yet to: Flying Doctors Nigeria. The air ambulance company has airlifted more than 500 patients to safety, and has seen Orekunrin rewarded with a TED fellowship, as well as lecturing on entrepreneurship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Invisible crises: have donors forgotten the hungry in Chad?

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Guardian

Why are WFP and UNHCR struggling to raise funds for humanitarian emergencies that don’t make the headlines?

It’s been called “disaster overload” – major crises in Syria, Iraq, South Sudan, the Central African Republic (CAR) and the Philippines have left the United Nations’ humanitarian response system reeling. But as media attention gravitates toward the major crises, there’s been little thought to the long tail of the humanitarian system.

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World + 2 others
Why gender disaster data matters: ‘In some villages, all the dead were women’

Report
Guardian

Data on the 2004 tsunami found that women were more affected than men. It’s time to recognise gender in disaster response

Philippa Ross in Suva

Disasters triggered by climate change are not blind to gender and age. They affect men and women, the old and the young, very differently. Sex and age are some of the most powerful indicators of how individuals will experience a disaster: who survives and who dies. Despite this, we have worryingly little data on the issue.

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Funding water projects: are donors flushing good money away?

Report
Guardian

On day three of World Water Week, the question of who pays for what floats to the surface

Eliza Anyangwe in Stockholm

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The price of an education for Afghan refugees in Iran

Report
Guardian

Families brave xenophobia and economic woes to give their children the chance of a better future

Decades of subsistence farming have curved 65-year-old Isa’s spine and turned his cheeks a rich, leathery brown. The white-haired father of seven obtained legal refugee status in Iran over three decades ago, fleeing war and crushing poverty as the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan. Two political regimes later, Isa must still stay off the main road when he rides his motorbike to work.