CPAR
Non-governmental Organization based in Canada

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World + 4 others
CPAR report - Spring 2013

IMPROVING MATERNAL, NEWBORN AND CHILD HEALTH CARE IN AFRICA

In the next five minutes....
3 women will lose their lives to complications of pregnancy or childbirth, 60 others will suffer debilitating injuries and infection due to the same causes, and 70 children will die, nearly 30 of them newborn babies. Countless other babies will be stillborn or suffer potentially long-term consequences of being born prematurely. The vast majority of these deaths and disabilities are preventable.
- Countdown to 2015, Maternal, Newborn & Child Survival (2012)

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Seed Fairs in Ethiopia Increase Crop Production and Productivity

In order to increase crop production and productivity, CPAR-Ethiopia has been distributing various improved seed technologies to the farming communities in Were Jarso district since 2010.

Improved wheat, teff, maize, potato, and chickpeas were the major seed types distributed and demonstrated at field level by Farmer Field School groups. The performance of these seed technologies were found successful and generally demonstrated a yield advantage of more than two folds over the local varieties.

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Supporting people living with HIV with rabbit production

Small ruminant livestock play a vital role in the livelihoods of many rural communities providing food, income and manure. Supporting farmers with small livestock like rabbits has proved to be a practical, achievable and cost-effective way of reducing the vulnerability of living with HIV.

Robert Chisuzi, 40, is a farmer from Chisuzi village, GVH Kambalani in Lilongwe district and is married to Christina, 40. Together they have four children (Pilirani 14 years and Samson, 8 years, Elizabeth 17 years and Florida 10 years).

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Farmer Field Schools: A Dream Come True for Malawian Farmers

Recently CPAR Malawi’s Farmers First Program expanded into the two new group villages of Chinzu and Kabudula. This has brought both excitement and hope to vulnerable small-scale farmers living in the two areas. In the two areas, the project is supporting 500 beneficiaries through Farmer Field Schools (FFS). Through these Farmer Field Schools, small-scale farmers have learned new and improved agricultural methods.