Non-governmental Organization based in United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

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19 Jun 2017 description
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Practical Guide

Raped then rejected: The girl soldiers of Congo

New report reveals cycle of violence and rejection suffered by former girl soldiers in Democratic Republic of Congo and hears why some are re-joining armed groups

• Majority of girl soldiers interviewed were sexually abused by soldiers
• Up to 40% of child soldiers in DRC are girls, but of thousands released by the UN only 7% were girls
• Stigmatisation, family rejection at home causing some to re-join armed groups

02 Jun 2017 description
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Arabic version

An Open Letter to UN Secretary-General António Guterres

As organizations working to protect the rights of children in armed conflict, we are dismayed by your reported decision to “freeze” any new additions of parties to conflict that commit grave violations of children’s rights to the annexes to your 2017 annual report to the United Nations Security Council on children and armed conflict. We urge you to reconsider, and issue an updated list with your report, including all perpetrators responsible for patterns of grave violations against children in 2016.

14 Mar 2017 description

On February 8, the UN General Assembly held an informal meeting marking the 20th Anniversary of Resolution 51/77 (1997) on the promotion and protection of the rights of children. This resolution established the mandate of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict (SRSG-CAAC). In his opening remarks, President of the General Assembly, H.E. Mr. Peter Thomson, called the resolution “a landmark development in our global efforts to improve the protection of children in conflict situations.” A high-level panel discussion was moderated by SRSG-CAAC Ms.

14 Nov 2016 description

[14 November 2016] – Staying in school protects girls from recruitment and other grave violations by armed groups, says Child Soldiers International in a new report published today. Research conducted by the organisation in 2016 shows that many girls who joined armed groups in eastern DRC did so because they had been forced to drop out of school.

About a third of the 150 girls interviewed during the research had voluntarily joined an armed group, and almost half of them had joined because they could no longer pay their school fees.