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18 Dec 2014 description
report CARE

Remembering the Tsunami: A Decade of Strengthening Humanitarian Response

Ten years ago, the global community faced what was one of the biggest tests of humanitarianism in recent history.

On Dec. 26, 2004, an earthquake rumbled off the coast of Indonesia, triggering a series of devastating tsunamis that struck 14 countries across the Indian Ocean. At least 228,000 people lost their lives and millions more were left homeless.

18 Dec 2014 description

The unprecedented £392m donated by the generous UK public to the Disasters Emergency Committee’s Tsunami Earthquake Appeal ten years ago not only provided homes for tens of thousands of people, it helped change the way humanitarian agencies respond to large-scale disasters, the DEC said today.

18 Dec 2014 description
report ACT Alliance

When the earth shook in 2004 under the seaside village of Kuala Bubon, Husna was washing clothes at a well. She ran to find her mother, but the older woman refused to leave their house near the sea. So Husna ran with her 8-year old son Bagus to the mosque, where some villagers were hurriedly preparing to leave. She left Bagus there and returned for her mother, who again refused to leave, even though the sea level was dropping drastically–a prelude to a tsunami, though Husna admits she’d never heard the word before.

18 Dec 2014 description

Listen Ten years on from the Indian Ocean tsunami, we remember how the world worked together to rebuild shattered lives and communities.

Monday December 22, 2014

The tsunami that cut a swathe of destruction across the Indian Ocean 10 years ago, also gave rise to one of the world's biggest relief and recovery efforts.

18 Dec 2014 description
report Oxfam

Ten years on and Tsunami response changed lives for good

The humanitarian response to the Indian Ocean Tsunami saved lives and gave people the means to rebuild their futures, Oxfam says today.

The tsunami on Boxing Day ten years ago was unprecedented. It hit 14 countries and affected 5 million people, killing an estimated 230,000 people and making 1.7 million homeless.

16 Dec 2014 description
report Caritas

On 26 December 2004, an earthquake in the Indian Ocean triggered a tsunami that devastated India, Indonesia, Sri Lanka and Aceh. Over a quarter of a million people were killed and 1.5 million made homeless.

Caritas launched a half-a-billion dollar programme, providing emergency assistance to over a million people, built permanent houses for 33,000 families and helped provide livelihoods for over 85,000 people.

Hardest hit was the Indonesian province of Aceh. A decade later, Caritas caught up with some of the people and programmes it supported.

Boat on roof

15 Dec 2014 description

On 26 December 2004, the world experienced the Indian Ocean Tsunami, one of the deadliest natural disasters ever recorded. At an event held at the Foreign Correspondents Club of Thailand last week, panelists took stock of the progress made in building greater resilience to disasters in Asia-Pacific, and also highlighted outstanding gaps and priorities for the way forward.

14 Dec 2014 description
report Malteser

Help for body, mind and soul

On 26 December 2004, the most devastating tsunami in history brought death, misery and immense suffering to the people on the shores of the Indian Ocean. In its aftermath, 250,000 people were dead or missing, and nearly 1.7 million lost their homes. Immediately, Malteser International ran to the aid of the survivors – with both material as well as psychological assistance. A large-scale, sustainable reconstruction and reintegration program followed.

14 Dec 2014 description

Banda Aceh, Indonesia | AFP | Sunday 12/14/2014 - 03:45 GMT

by Nurdin Hasan

When a tsunami engulfed Indonesia's Aceh a decade ago, it not only killed tens of thousands of people but also wiped the slate clean in the conflict-racked, poverty-stricken province and paved the way for peace.

The province on the northern tip of Sumatra island was ill-prepared when disaster struck -- in ruins, mired in poverty and with barely any functioning infrastructure after almost three decades of conflict.

10 Dec 2014 description
report Swiss Red Cross

Il y a dix ans, un violent tsunami dévastait les régions côtières du sud de l’Asie, faisant 260 000 victimes et des millions de sans-abris. Après avoir mis sur pied ce qui demeure aujourd’hui encore la plus vaste opération d’aide d’urgence de son histoire, la CRS s’est attachée à reconstruire écoles, habitations et dispensaires.

04 Dec 2014 description

Tout le monde se souvient de ce qu’il faisait ce jour-là, quand les images ont déferlé quasiment en direct dans les foyers. C’était il y a 10 ans. Le 26 décembre 2004 se produisait le plus grave tsunami de l’histoire : les côtes d'Indonésie, du Sri Lanka et du sud de l'Inde, ainsi que l'ouest de la Thaïlande étaient dévastées en quelques heures.

03 Dec 2014 description

Ten years after the devastating tsunami of 26 December 2004 struck the countries of the Indian Ocean, over 130 participants met at a conference in Jakarta (Indonesia) organised on 24-25 November by the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO and the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG).

25 Nov 2014 description

Jakarta, Indonesia, 24 Nov 2014 -- With the ten year anniversary of the devastating Indian Ocean Tsunami just weeks away, representatives from ASEAN member countries are assessing the lessons they’ve learned and action taken since then to increase the resilience of agricultural livelihoods to natural disasters.

18 Nov 2014 description

Ten years ago, a tsunami inflicted devastation and enormous suffering on large parts of South-East Asia. GIZ supported the reconstruction process on behalf of the German Government and initiated many improvements.

13 Nov 2014 description
report Inter Press Service

PICHAVARAM, India, Nov 13 2014 (IPS) - When the Asian tsunami washed over several Indian Ocean Rim countries on Boxing Day 2004, it left a trail of destruction in its wake, including a death toll that touched 230,000.

Millions lost their jobs, food security and traditional livelihoods and many have spent the last decade trying to pick up the pieces of their lives. But for a small tribe in southern India, the tsunami didn’t bring devastation; instead, it brought hope.

13 Sep 2014 description

The Tsunami Warning System established under the auspices of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO in the Indian Ocean following the December 2004 disaster is functioning effectively. This was demonstrated in a simulation exercise conducted on 9 and 10 September 2014, with the participation of 24 countries of the Indian Ocean Rim*.

According to the preliminary results of the simulated alert, all of the participating countries received timely tsunami advisory messages, and no delays were reported.

09 Sep 2014 description
report Guardian

Data on the 2004 tsunami found that women were more affected than men. It’s time to recognise gender in disaster response

Philippa Ross in Suva

Disasters triggered by climate change are not blind to gender and age. They affect men and women, the old and the young, very differently. Sex and age are some of the most powerful indicators of how individuals will experience a disaster: who survives and who dies. Despite this, we have worryingly little data on the issue.

05 Sep 2014 description

Ten years after the strongest tsunami in living memory in 2004, 24 countries of the Indian Ocean Rim* will participate in a large scale simulation exercise organized under the auspices of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO on 9 and 10 September to test the Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning and Mitigation System. The goal is to measure the capacity and response times of the various stakeholders involved to address such rare but potentially destructive events.

05 Sep 2014 description
report Inter Press Service

By Malini Shankar

CAR NICOBAR, India, Sep 5 2014 (IPS) - When the 2004 Asian Tsunami lashed the coasts and island territories of India, one of the hardest hit areas were the Andaman and Nicobar Islands (ANI), which lie due east of mainland India, at the juncture of the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea.

Remote and isolated, the tribal communities that occupy these idyllic isles have lived for centuries off the land, eschewing all forms of modern ‘development’ and sustaining themselves off the catch from the rich seas that surround them.