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02 Dec 2016 description

HIGHLIGHTS

  • More than 4.6 million people in Nigeria’s Adamawa, Borno, and Yobe states are experiencing acute food insecurity

  • IOM identifies nearly 198,900 IDPs in Cameroon’s Far North Region

  • Armed actors continues to attack civilians and security forces in the Lake Chad Basin region

KEY DEVELOPMENTS

02 Dec 2016 description
report IRIN

Mausi Segun | Senior Nigeria researcher at Human Rights Watch

Snatched schoolgirls and suicide bomb blasts have long been the enduring images of Nigeria’s Boko Haram conflict. But now the violence is represented by thousands of new faces: those of starving children.

Read the full article on IRIN

02 Dec 2016 description

(Abuja: 2 December 2016): The 2017 Humanitarian Response Plan for Nigeria seeks more than US$1 billion to address the needs of those in crisis in the three most affected states of Borno, Adamawa and Yobe, with 75 partners ready to respond to those needs where areas are accessible.

01 Dec 2016 description

ABUJA – More than 45,000 people received life-saving food or nutrition support in northeastern Nigeria in the last week through a new tactic by the World Food Programme (WFP) to reach those in the most remote, hard-to-access places hit by Boko Haram violence.

With support from UNICEF, WFP designed a Rapid Response Mechanism to supply food, nutrition and health support to people most in need in Borno and Yobe states by flying teams of specialists to remote areas where they stay up to six days. The assistance is then brought in by road.

01 Dec 2016 description

It’s a bright and sunny morning in Soutouta, a remote village located in Goudiry, in Eastern Senegal. Usually calm at that time of the day, the public square of the village is now bustling and full of people, all waiting patiently in line for their food vouchers.

“Last year’s harvest was very poor. This year, it is even worse,” said Dialang Gassama, a woman living in Soutouta. “We sowed much but harvested almost nothing.”

01 Dec 2016 description

Les plus graves niveaux d’insécurité alimentaire persisteront dans le nord-est du Nigeria

MESSAGES CLÉS

01 Dec 2016 description
report UN Children's Fund

31 October 2016

Highlights

• As of end of October 2016, there are 123,293 people displaced by the Nigerian crisis in Chad’s Lac region. Three additional sites were discovered this month.

• A Hepatitis E outbreak has been reported in the Salamat Region. A total of 128 cases, including 20 positive cases (16% positivity rate) and 2 deaths (1.6% case-fatality) were registered in Amtiman, the main city of Salamat Region.

01 Dec 2016 description

Millet, maize, and sorghum are the most important food commodities for household consumption. Millet is the staple of the most vulnerable households, while maize and sorghum also contribute to the food basket of a majority of all households. Sankaryare market is the largest and most important market in Ouagadougou and supplies other markets within the country and region. Koudougou is located in one of the most populated areas in the country, where a majority of households depend on the market for their food needs. Djibo is in the highly vulnerable Sahelian zone.

01 Dec 2016 description

Sorghum, millet, white maize, and local and imported rice are the most important food commodities. Millet is most heavily consumed in the eastern and northern regions of the country. Local rice is another basic food commodity, especially for poorer households. Imported rice and white maize are most commonly consumed in and around the capital. The Marché d'Atrone in N’Djamena, the capital city, is the largest market for cereals. Moundou is an important consumer center for sorghum and the second largest market after the capital. The Abéché market is located in a northern production area.

01 Dec 2016 description

Millet, rice, and sorghum constitute the basic staple foods for the majority of the Malian population. Millet has traditionally been the most widely consumed, but since 2005 rice has become a popular substitute in urban households. Sorghum is generally more important for rural than urban households. Markets included are indicative of local conditions within their respective regions. Ségou is one of the most important markets for both the country and region because it is located in a very large grain production area.

01 Dec 2016 description

Local rice and sorghum are the most consumed food products by poor households in Mauritania followed by imported wheat which is a substitute that these households turn to the most. Local rice is grown in the river valley (in the southern regions of Trarza, Brakna, Gorgol and Guidimakha). Sorghum is produced in all areas of production (rainfed) and in flood-recession areas. However, a significant portion is imported from Mali and Senegal. Mauritania depends greatly on food imports (70% in a good agricultural year and 85% in a bad year) than on internal production.

01 Dec 2016 description

Millet, maize, cowpea, and imported rice are the most important food commodities. Millet is consumed by both rural and poor urban households throughout the country. Maize and imported rice are most important for urban households, while cowpea is mainly consumed by poor households in rural and urban areas as a protein source. Niamey is the most important national market and an international trade center, and also supplies urban households. Tillaberi is also an urban center that supplies the surrounding area. Gaya market represents a main urban market for maize with cross-border connections.

01 Dec 2016 description

Sorghum, maize, millet, cowpea, gari (fermented cassava starch), and rice are all found in Nigerian markets. Sorghum, millet and maize are widely consumed by most households, but especially in the north, and are used by various industries. Maize is mainly used by the poultry industry as a raw material for feed while sorghum is used by breweries for producing beverages. Sorghum and millet are important for households in the north, particularly the border markets where millet is also heavily traded with Niger. Gari is widely consumed by households in the south and some in the north.

01 Dec 2016 description

Rice, millet, sorghum, and maize are the primary staple foods in Senegal. Groundnuts are both an important source of protein and a commonly grown cash crop. Imported rice is consumed daily by the vast majority of households in Senegal particularly in Dakar and Touba urban centers. Local rice is produced and consumed in the Senegal River Valley. St. Louis is a major market for the Senegal River Valley. Millet is consumed in central regions where Kaolack is the most important regional market. Maize is produced and consumed in areas around Kaolack, Tambacounda, and the Senegal River Valley.