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02 Dec 2016 description
  • As of 30 November 2016, UN-coordinated appeals and refugee response plans within the Global Humanitarian Overview (GHO) require US$22.1 billion to meet the needs of 96.2 million humanitarian crisis-affected people in 40 countries. Together the appeals are funded at $11.4 billion, leaving a shortfall of $10.7 billion.

04 Oct 2016 description

As of 30 September 2016, UN-coordinated appeals and refugee response plans within the Global Humanitarian Overview (GHO) require US$22 billion to meet the needs of 95 million humanitarian crisis-affected people in 40 countries. Together the appeals are funded at $9.4 billion, leaving a shortfall of $12.6 billion.

19 Sep 2016 description
infographic World Food Programme
  • While the 2015-2016 El Niño weather event is now over, humanitarian needs continue to grow, and are not expected to peak until early 2017 as food security continues to deteriorate in many regions. WFP, working closely with partners on the ground, is rapidly scaling up life-saving operations for communities reeling from the catastrophic effects of El Niño.

16 Sep 2016 description

This update is based on internal displacement figures made available to IDMC across 16 countries from January-August 2016. These figures will be updated and expanded upon regularly and can be accessed via IDMC’s Global Internal Displacement Database (GIDD) which can be viewed at http://www.internal-displacement.org/database.

01 Sep 2016 description

As of 31 August 2016, UN-coordinated appeals and refugee response plans as covered by the Global Humanitarian Overview (GHO) require US$21.7 billion to meet the needs of 95.4 million people affected by humanitarian crises in 40 countries. Global requirements are adjusted throughout the year as response plans are revised, both upwards and downwards, to reflect up-to-date needs.
The current decrease has resulted from revisions of plans for Ethiopia, Afghanistan and Yemen.

16 Aug 2016 description

What is La Niña?

La Niña is the cooling of sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific, which occurs roughly every three to five years, lasting from six to 24 months. On average, half of El Niño events are followed by a La Niña, which typically affects global climate patterns in the opposite way El Niño does. The intensity of the La Niña climatic phenomenon generally peaks between October and January

Purpose of this report

10 Aug 2016 description

Globally, millions of vulnerable people are experiencing increased hunger and poverty due to droughts, floods, storms and extreme temperature fluctuations as a result of a climatic occurrence: El Niño.

The 2015/2016 occurrence is one of the most severe in a half-century and the strongest El Niño since 1997/1998. The negative consequences of El Niño are foreseen to continue through 2017, particularly in Southern Africa where this event has followed multiple droughts compounding the already fragile situation.

03 Aug 2016 description

As of 31 July 2016, UN-coordinated Humanitarian Response Plans (HRP), Flash Appeals and Regional Refugee Plans as covered by the Global Humanitarian Overview (GHO) require US$21.9 billion to meet the needs of 96.9 million people affected by humanitarian crises in 40 countries. The appeals are funded at $7.2 billion, with unmet requirements totalling $14.7 billion. Overall, donors have contributed $13.7 billion towards humanitarian operations in 2016 and pledged a further $814.4 million.

14 Jul 2016 description

Globally, millions of vulnerable people are experiencing increased hunger and poverty due to droughts, floods, storms and extreme temperature fluctuations as a result of a climatic occurrence: El Niño. This phenomenon is not an individual weather event but a climate pattern which occurs every two to seven years and lasts 9-12 months. The 2015/2016 occurrence is one of the most severe in a half-century and the strongest El Niño since 1997/1998 which killed some 21,000 people and caused damage to infrastructure worth US$ 36 billion.

06 Jul 2016 description

Globally, millions of vulnerable people are experiencing increased hunger and poverty due to droughts, floods, storms and extreme temperature fluctuations as a result of a climatic occurrence: El Niño. This phenomenon is not an individual weather event but a climate pattern which occurs every two to seven years and lasts 9-12 months. The 2015/2016 occurrence is one of the most severe in a half-century and the strongest El Niño since 1997/1998 which killed some 21,000 people and caused damage to infrastructure worth US$ 36 billion.

05 Jul 2016 description

Global overview

What is La Niña?

La Niña is the cooling of sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific, which occurs roughly every three to five years, lasting from six to 24 months. The chances of La Niña following an El Niño episode are higher on average — half of the El Niño events are followed by a La Niña — and typically it affects global climate patterns in the opposite way El Niño does. The intensity of the La Niña climatic phenomenon generally peaks between October and January.

Purpose of this report

05 Jul 2016 description

What is El Niño?

El Niño is the warming of sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific, which occurs roughly every two to seven years, lasting from six to 24 months.

01 Jul 2016 description

1 July 2016, GENEVA – The UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) and the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) aim to reduce disaster losses in some of the world’s most hazard prone cities with the initial aid of a €6 million grant from the EU, over the next three years. Mr. Neven Mimica, European Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development said: ”Strengthening disaster risk governance is an essential part of sustainable development and a key priority of the Sendai Framework.

21 Jun 2016 description

What is El Niño?

El Niño is the warming of sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific, which occurs roughly every two to seven years, lasting from six to 24 months.