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Floods in Pakistan mean misery for children

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World Vision

Author: Asif Raza

Zainab, 3, had never seen flood waters before. She didn’t understand how destructive they could be until she had witnessed the devastation herself. In addition to the visible marks left on the landscape, the floods have left their marks on Zainab as well. Due to the contaminated water, she is suffering from skin infections and high fever. She is also traumatized and trying to process the loss of her maternal grandfather, who drowned in the flood.

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World + 5 others
An update on World Vision’s commitments to the UN Secretary-General’s Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health ‘EVERY WOMAN EVERY CHILD ’

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World Vision

World Vision’s strategic commitments to Every Woman Every Child

the six strategic commitments that World Vision has made to Every Woman Every Child (eWec) ensure a combined and compound investment of resources to address maternal and child morbidity (including malnutrition) and mortality.

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Pakistan: World Vision responds to killer diseases

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World Vision

By Shahzad Badar, Communications Manager, World Vision Pakistan

This year’s monsoon in Pakistan left damaged earth and disease in its wake.

Families made destitute due to last year’s flooding have again been rendered homeless and stripped of their livelihoods as their fields turn into muddy swamps.

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Haiti + 1 other
World Vision calls on U.S. Senate to restore budget for global disaster responses and development

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World Vision
· Leading relief NGOs, in joint letter, warn that House budget cuts imperil life-saving disaster aid

· World Vision calls on Senate to reverse cuts to effective humanitarian assistance in U.S. budget

Washington, DC, February 23, 2011-As U.S. Senate lawmakers prepare to decide on fiscal 2011 spending next week, World Vision and other top humanitarian relief agencies call on them to restore the funding stripped away from effective and life-saving international disaster assistance and development programs in a bill approved by the House.

The budget resolution approved by the

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Pakistan: Crisis continues six months after disastrous floods

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World Vision
By World Vision staff

Six months after catastrophic monsoon floods tore through Pakistan from north to south, marooning some 21 million people, including 9 million children, destroying 1.7 million homes and damaging 5.4 million acres of arable land, the crisis remains far from over and humanitarian needs are still great. At their height, the floods submerged one-fifth of Pakistan, an area the size of the United Kingdom, and destroyed everything in their path.

As the world's focus turned to Pakistan, World Vision supporters from more than ten countries responded generously

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Pakistan: World Vision says emergency will "get worse before it gets better"

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World Vision
- Access to some of the hardest-hit areas remains one of the biggest challenges, up to half of affected population still not reached

- Aid worker says people are in "worse shape now than they were two weeks ago"

More than one month after the flooding in Pakistan began, World Vision says the emergency in Pakistan will get worse before it gets better. Up to half of the affected population still hasn't been reached. Unsanitary conditions and a lack of clean water are causing outbreaks of diarrhea and concerns about cholera. Children, wearing

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Pakistan: Survey in hardest-hit districts finds rapid increase of diarrhea, skin diseases in children

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World Vision
Aid agency says needs of the displaced "far exceed" the resources available

Health concerns exacerbated by lack of shelter, some families may not be able to return home for at least three months

World Vision says assessments conducted over the last few days near the towns of Muzaffar Garh and Kot Addo in Punjab paint a bleak picture of the impact of the flooding. The Christian humanitarian organisation says its reports from Sukkur in the Sindh Province are equally dire. Contaminated water, cramped living conditions and a lack

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Floods soak southern Pakistan, World Vision prepares response

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World Vision
By World Vision MEER Communications

Vast floods are creating a critical situation in southern Pakistan, with local media reports suggesting that millions of people are fleeing areas under threat from the deluge.

Flood waters flowing down the five rivers of northern Pakistan have converged in the Indus River flowing through Upper and Lower Sindh. Swollen by the heavy rains which continued through the end of last week, the water has damaged more than 173,000 homes in Sindh, affecting more than one million people, according to the latest

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Pakistan: Flood relief efforts scale up as Ramadan begins

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World Vision
by World Vision MEER Comms

As the scale of the crisis in Pakistan continues to grow, World Vision is stepping up efforts to meet the needs of families affected by the flood and who now face a month of fasting during Ramadan*.

On Wednesday World Vision began distributing shelter kits, cooking implements and gas cylinders to 100 families in Pashtun Garhi in Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa Province (KPK). Distributions of floor mats, bedding and food kits containing flour, sugar, rice, beans, tea, dates and oil to families in Charsada, Nowshera and Peshawar will start within a week.

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Pakistan: Renewed heavy rains and flash floods hamper relief efforts

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World Vision
By Muhammad Ali, Senior Communications Officer, World Vision Pakistan

Unrelenting downpours, fresh floods and landslides are hampering efforts to provide urgently needed food to millions of people displaced or stranded by floods across Pakistan last week.

Although water had begun to recede in some areas, new rains have closed roads and washed out bridges, making it difficult for aid workers to move around the country. Heavy rain is forecast to further lash the country for the next 36 hours.

"Until the water recedes or we have

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World Vision to help 150,000 people affected by floods in Pakistan

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World Vision
By Dwayne Mamo, MEER Communications (8 August 2010)

World Vision continues to help thousands in the northern Pakistan Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa province (KPK) and plans to help at least 150,000 people (20,000 families), including people living in Punjab and Sindh provinces to the east and south, as the flood waters and rain that continue to ravage the north move southward.

"This disaster is worse than the earthquake in 2005 because after the earthquake, people could recover things like jewellery, mattresses and utensils, while this flood swept away everything

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Pakistan: Response continues; clinic opened in Lower Dir

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World Vision
By World Vision staff

With evidence of waterborne disease on the rise, World Vision today opened an emergency primary health clinic in Lower Dir, an area of Pakistan severely hit by monsoons and floods. The clinic has already received an influx of patients from the area, including many who lost their homes.

World Vision is worried that waterborne diseases such as diarrhea and cholera will spread among the homeless. Increasing numbers of children are already reported to be suffering from skin diseases and eye infections.

Dr. Sheraz Iqbal said: "People are

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Pakistan: Tremendous immediate and long-term challenges in flood response

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World Vision
By World Vision staff

One of the worst hit districts of Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa (formerly called North West Frontier Province) has been reached by World Vision relief workers and food and water was delivered to the first 1,000 families and 365 children. The aid organisation is working to step up its distributions in the next days. It is also planning to start providing cooking utensils and hygiene kits as soon as possible.

While many displaced families have not received anything over the last 5 days since the heavy rains began, relief

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Pakistan: World Vision struggles to reach flood survivors; funding urgently needed

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World Vision
Threat of disease outbreaks, need for drinking water are greatest concerns

Aid group warns death count could rise further; road access is still blocked in many areas

World Vision is planning a rapid response in Pakistan as unprecedented monsoon rains have triggered flash floods killing more than 1,300 people. With hundreds of people missing and more rain expected, World Vision fears the death toll could rise further. The relief group hopes to begin distributions of food and clean water as early as tomorrow, but can only use small trucks to transport aid because roads

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Anger and Hate versus Peace and Prosperity: The real battle for Pakistan's future continues

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World Vision
Exactly one week ago, at 9.20 am on March 10, a routine office meeting was shattered by the sound of armed militants storming a World Vision office in Northwest Pakistan. The gunmen opened fire and detonated a bomb, destroying the office as they left. Six World Vision staff members, including two women, were killed. Eight more were injured, three of them seriously; one so seriously that he died four days later.

The attack on World Vision staff in Pakistan serves as grim evidence that humanitarian space cannot be protected, even

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Pakistan: Attack on World Vision staff brutal and senseless

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World Vision
World Vision today is mourning the brutal and senseless deaths of six members of our staff in the Mansehra District of Pakistan after an unprovoked attack by gunmen.

The international humanitarian organisation is seeking to confirm reports that gunmen first set off bombs or grenades, then opened fire on the office, located 65 kilometres north of the capital, Islamabad.

In addition to those killed, seven employees are hospitalised with injuries.

No threatening letters were received prior to the attack.

World Vision's relief and development

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InterAction, Oxfam and World Vision Discuss Attack on Humanitarian Workers with World Vision in Pakistan

More than five years after a deadly earthquake killed some 80,000 people there, humanitarian workers with World Vision are still providing aid in northwest Pakistan. With news today that several were killed in a politically motivated extremist attack, InterAction President and CEO Sam Worthington, Oxfam America's Director of Aid Effectiveness Paul O'Brien and World Vision's Pakistan Program Manager Darin Hamlin joined Kojo Nnamdi of American University Radio (WAMU in Washington, DC) to explore the challenges, training and accomplishments of development workers in disaster and conflict zones.
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Pakistan: World Vision focuses on needs of displaced children and families returning home

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World Vision
As the return of some 2 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Pakistan's northwest region gains momentum, World Vision is underscoring both the right of the displaced to return voluntarily and the need for sustained security and safety in areas of return.

World Vision is particularly concerned with the protection and assistance required by vulnerable populations and is working to ensure that the rights and needs of the displaced are met. Those most at risk include children (especially unaccompanied minors), expectant mothers, mothers with young children, female heads of household,

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Pakistan: Rights of the displaced key concern as return gains momentum

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World Vision
By Syed Haider Ali and Rebecca Lyman, World Vision

As the return of some 2 million Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) in Pakistan's northwest gains momentum, World Vision is underscoring both the right of the displaced to return voluntarily and the need for sustained security and safety in areas of return.

The protection and assistance required by children, especially unaccompanied minors, expectant mothers, mothers with young children, female heads of household, persons with disabilities and elderly persons, is a particular concern for World Vision and other

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Aid worker's blog: Two million Pakistanis long for home

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World Vision
By Chris Webster

It is good to be home. After just a month away it's so good to see family and friends.

I've just returned from working in Pakistan's North West Frontier Province where more than two million people are longing to return home after being forced from their homes and villages by ongoing violence.

They are caught in the crossfire as government forces fight insurgents. Seven weeks since the conflict erupted, the frontline is now shifting towards another troubled part of Pakistan on the Afghan border in South Waziristan. The violence continues and, with it, another